Become a fan on Facebook Follow us on Twitter USDA Blog Feed Watch USDA videos on YouTube Subscribe to receive e-mail updates View USDA Photos on Flickr Subscribe to RSS Feeds

A Maryland Egg Producer Plans to Cut Energy Costs and Create Electricity with USDA Rural Development and State Support

Monday was breezy in rural Maryland, but a crowd of about 70 was in high spirits as federal, state and local officials gathered at Sunnyside Farms to inaugurate a new solar panel system that will reduce power costs at this major egg producing facility.

The folks at Sunnyside Farms in Westminster gather about 29,000 dozen eggs a day, and most of those eggs go to the Baltimore area.  The one acre solar array, which was funded through USDA Rural Development, a grant from the Maryland Energy Administration, and tax credits, will save an estimated 25 percent of the farm’s electrical costs each year.

USDA Maryland Rural Development State Director Jack Tarburton noted that the project promotes the Obama Administration’s effort to transition to a renewable energy economy, one that is good for business, creates jobs and reduces energy consumption.   He used the occasion to announce 13 other recipients of USDA funding to reduce energy costs.

During the ceremony marking the inauguration of the project, Maryland Secretary of Agriculture Earl (Buddy) Hance created some laughter by noting that the wind was pretty brisk that day in rural Maryland and said that ” in addition to powering the egg farm with energy from the sun, Sunnyside Farms should consider a wind turbine, too.”

If you are a business owner or ag producer and want to find out more about how to lower energy costs, or even create energy from wind, solar or other sources, click here.

Brad Rill, Vice President of Sunnyside Farms is pictured with his wife Tracey and children Tyler, Logan, Molly and Keegan in front of the solar panel array that supports the families chicken-egg production facility in Westminster.  Sunnyside Farms gathers 29,000 dozen eggs per day.

Brad Rill, Vice President of Sunnyside Farms is pictured with his wife Tracey and children Tyler, Logan, Molly and Keegan in front of the solar panel array that supports the families chicken-egg production facility in Westminster. Sunnyside Farms gathers 29,000 dozen eggs per day.

One Response to “A Maryland Egg Producer Plans to Cut Energy Costs and Create Electricity with USDA Rural Development and State Support”

  1. beej says:

    I want to know, what is life like for the chickens on this farm? Is this a humane operation? The kids are cute; do those cute kids see what life is like inside those chicken warehouses?

Leave a Reply