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Water Grows Our Economy – Lets Make it Last

Cotton is planted into wheat stubble on Kitten  Farms in Lubbock, Texas. This is one of many farming operations in the arid Texas High Plains region that utilizes minimum tillage methods to help conserve soil moisture and reduce water use through irrigation systems.

Cotton is planted into wheat stubble on Kitten Farms in Lubbock, Texas. This is one of many farming operations in the arid Texas High Plains region that utilizes minimum tillage methods to help conserve soil moisture and reduce water use through irrigation systems.

The general public has a fresh opportunity to learn how water grows an economy through a recently launched communications campaign in Texas’ High Plains region.

The “Water Grows Our Economy” education campaign is a joint effort between USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service in Texas, the Texas Corn Producers Board and Texas Tech University. It includes televised public service announcements, a 10-minute video and a newly launched Web site, www.WaterGrowsJobs.org, with the slogan “Water grows our economy; let’s make it last.”

(L to R) Landowner Jeff  Kitten and NRCS District Conservationist Randy Underwood  review a newly installed micro or subsurface drip irrigation system on Kitten’s Farm. NRCS provided technical assistance on the design and installation to improve efficiencies of agricultural water use in the irrigation system.

(L to R) Landowner Jeff Kitten and NRCS District Conservationist Randy Underwood review a newly installed micro or subsurface drip irrigation system on Kitten’s Farm. NRCS provided technical assistance on the design and installation to improve efficiencies of agricultural water use in the irrigation system.

The Texas Corn Producers Board has headed up the campaign, which provides insight into the economic significance of both agriculture and water. NRCS was asked to provide input through technical assistance and information sharing on the latest water-efficient irrigation systems, along with information about additional conservation practices that benefit everyone who lives and works in the region.

Water Grows Our Economy” informs the public about water conservation measures being implemented by producers with the assistance of NRCS. It highlights how producers conserve water without reducing the economic vitality of the region.

The video captures conservation practices at work for wind and water erosion control, including conservation tillage and no-till conservation methods. It shows how leaving crop residues conserves moisture on the soil surface, reduces soil temperature and reduces irrigation needs.

The video also touches on why producers value water conservation and continue their daily efforts to ensure water is available for future generations, countering some perceptions that agricultural irrigation systems waste water and that water should be reserved for other uses.

The soil, climate and groundwater of the Texas Panhandle and South Plains combine to make this one of the most productive regions in the world, and with its partners, NRCS is educating the public and helping producers to sustain these resources for the future.

Find out more about “Water Grows Our Economy.”

Check out more conservation stories on the USDA blog.

Follow NRCS on Twitter.

Micro or subsurface drip irrigation is another efficient system that is installed approximately 12 inches beneath the soil surface to deliver water more efficiently to the plant and the root systems. In accordance with NRCS technical guidelines and specifications, these types of irrigation systems are designed to meet a 96 percent efficiency rating and have been proven to meet standard requirements.

Micro or subsurface drip irrigation is another efficient system that is installed approximately 12 inches beneath the soil surface to deliver water more efficiently to the plant and the root systems. In accordance with NRCS technical guidelines and specifications, these types of irrigation systems are designed to meet a 96 percent efficiency rating and have been proven to meet standard requirements.

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