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Delaware Homeownership Month Celebration Focuses on Rural Housing, Rural Jobs

Local construction contractors attended a June 22nd ‘work day’ event in the Crescent Shores Subdivision in Lincoln, Delaware to tell the audience of volunteers, homeowners and federal and state officials of how the USDA Rural Development Self-Help Housing Program has kept their businesses alive.

The Self-Help Housing Program was established as a path to homeownership for very-low to low-income families, utilizing a sweat equity model.  It is the only federally –funded homeownership program specifically for rural America.

Home Construction creating Jobs:  Self-Help Housing Homes being built at the Crescent Shores Subdivision, Lincoln, Delaware.

Home Construction creating Jobs: Self-Help Housing Homes being built at the Crescent Shores Subdivision, Lincoln, Delaware.

The event was kicked off by Milford Housing Development Corporation (MHDC) and is the only agency in Delaware operating the Self-Help Housing Program, having assisted over 120 Self-Help families to achieve their dream of homeownership since 1998.

With the uncertainty of the housing market and the slowdown in construction projects, Steve Reynolds, owner, Drywall Complete, was referred by a friend to MHDC.  Steve has enjoyed a great relationship with MHDC, stating that they make him feel like a part of the family!  The best part about working on the Self-Help homes is that MHDC is always on time with a check.

Dale Dukes, owner, Dukes Lumber Company, said that this year’s theme Rural Housing, Rural Jobs makes a real, positive statement.  The Dukes Lumber Company business was started in 1962 and is located on a rural back road.  They supply carpet, vinyl, lumber, kitchen cabinets, house wrap among many other materials.  The company has 50 employees and when the housing slowdown occurred they feared there would be layoffs or employees let go.  Gaining MHDC as an account has been a blessing.  They haven’t hired any additional employees, but are happy to provide jobs for the 50 they currently have.  The business is located in a rural area and many of his relatives live close by the business. Mr. Dukes said that life is about relationships and they are fortunate to be with MHDC.

Standing in front of a home at the Crescent Shores Subdivision are left to right:  Dale Dukes, owner, Dukes Lumber Company; Steve Reynolds, owner, Drywall Complete; Jack Tarburton, USDA Rural Development State Director; and David Moore, CEO and President of Milford Housing Development Corporation.

Standing in front of a home at the Crescent Shores Subdivision are left to right: Steve Reynolds, owner, Drywall Complete; Dale Dukes, owner, Dukes Lumber Company; Jack Tarburton, USDA Rural Development State Director; and David Moore, CEO and President of Milford Housing Development Corporation.

David Moore, President and CEO for MHDC said that they use over 40 different subcontractors in the Self-Help Housing Program that work in developments from Millsboro to Dover.

As summarized by Rural Development State Director, Jack Tarburton, “Milford Housing has always been first rate in the work that they do to support local families in their efforts towards homeownership.”

To learn more about USDA’s homeownership programs and how they can help you reach your goals, click here.

One Response to “Delaware Homeownership Month Celebration Focuses on Rural Housing, Rural Jobs”

  1. John Allan says:

    What does the Dept. of AGRICULTURE have to do with rural housing support? Isn’t this HUD’s mission? If there is a demand for agricultural products and money is flowing to producers who can meet that need, they can buy/build their own home, or at least find a place to rent, and so can their employees. This is a clear example of a misappropriated government program that is abusing taxpayer dollars in an attempt to create the illusion of jobs being “created.” No, jobs are not being “created,” tax dollars are paying people to do work–temporarily– that is clearly not needed nor demanded through normal market forces. If there is no demand, don’t try to artificially create a need to fill that in the end provides no sustainable solution those being “served.” This is obviously another “special interest” program that was totally polically-driven and should never have gotten through Congress nor have been carried out by USDA. What good is homeownership if the home cannot build equity??

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