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Aniin niije (Hello Friend) – Cultural Sharing and Meal Kicks Off Native American Celebration Month

Left to right guest speaker Dr. James E. Pete and Rural Business Specialist Ken Lynch presenting Dr. Pete with one of his drawings.

Left to right guest speaker Dr. James E. Pete and Rural Business Specialist Ken Lynch presenting Dr. Pete with one of his drawings.

South Dakota staff held a “kick-off” for Native American Heritage Month in early  November  with opening comments provided by State Director Meeks sharing a PowerPoint – 5 minutes 500 years – with statistical information gathered by the National Congress of American Indians, an Indian Taco meal, and guest speaker Dr. James E. Pete, who also provided a blessing before the meal.

Staff heard first hand from a respected elder in the Native American community and member of the Native American family from the Red cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Dr. James E. Pete.  Dr. Pete talked about the Native American/Indian Tribal Organization and Leadership, Understanding the Past, Living in the Present, Designing the Future for Tribal Organizations and Leadership which is also the title of his Doctoral project which concentrates on the encouragement of integration of traditional beliefs and philosophies into the Tribal Organization.

Dr. Pete whose Anishinaabe name is Guyaushk (Seagull) is a member of the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin, is from the Eagle Clan, has two sons, and seven grandchildren. He is a retired Government employee with years of service split between the Indian Health Service and the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

South Dakota Rural Business Specialist Ken Lynch, who is also a respected Tribal Member of the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians (Loon Clan), Red Cliff, WI organized the event. Ken Lynch was honored as a Military Veteran and respected Tribal Member by Dr. Pete with the presentation of a Tribal Flag for his service in the Army, 101st Airborne, 3rd/327 Infantry.

2 Responses to “Aniin niije (Hello Friend) – Cultural Sharing and Meal Kicks Off Native American Celebration Month”

  1. Grigol (Gia) Abramia says:

    “Hao”
    Dear State Director Meeks (Aniin niije),
    Grateful to study about Indian Meals. It is cultural heritage of Nations.
    I am from Georgia (Europe). It is already several centuries, since Georgia was introduced with Indian food.
    Indian food has been transformed and became in fact national food for Western Georgia. As you know Georgia is located on the border of Europe and Asia and ancient Silk Road passed through our country for centuries. Accordingly our food history counts many introduced food recipes from different countries of the world.
    I am sending you 2 receipt, which have Indian roots with modified Euro Asian approach.
    I hope it will be interesting for you.

    Best regards,

    Gia

    Director &CEO http://www.ICFER.org
    P.S. In case, if you may wish to provide joint research on an issue I will be interested

    GOMI

    Wash maize flour and put into a sauce-pan ( cast-iron kettle/pan). Pour water , boil and simmer until very well done, frequently stirring with a wooden spoon. Gradually rub in corn flour and continue stirring for about 10-15 minutes. Then leave on a very low heat with covered lid so as to let steam out. Keep on heat until the flour smell disappears ( approximately 15 minutes). Finally, stir the whole mass thoroughly.
    Gomi should be served hot on a separate plate for each person. It should be taken out from the sauce-pan with the wooden spoon dipped in cold water before every use.
    Serve hot with cheese slices in it or walnut sauce ( poured over it).

    2 teacups maize flour
    8 teacups water
    1 teacup corn flour

    SATSIVI

    Put a cleaned and thoroughly washed turkey into a sauce-pan. Cover it with cold water and boil. Remove scum. Place the boiled turkey on a platter and sprinkle with salt. Remove the fat from the broth and stew finely chopped onions in it. Mince walnuts 2-3 times. Pound garlic, coriander, saffron, cinnamon, add ground red pepper and vinegar to it and mix with minced walnuts. Blend the prepared mixture with the broth, add stewed onions and simmer for 8-10 minutes.
    Cut the boiled turkey into serving pieces. Put these pieces into the sauce-pan and simmer for another ten minutes. Place the prepared meal into a soup tureen. Serve cold.
    Satsivi can be served with Gomi.
    Generally Satsivi is prepared for Christmas.

    one medium turkey
    600 gr. walnuts
    5 medium onions
    1 teaspoon coriander
    4 garlic cloves
    1 teaspoon saffron
    1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
    1 teaspoon dry spices
    vinegar, ground red pepper and salt to taste

  2. Ken Lynch says:

    Hello,
    I appreciate the posting of this special event to kick off Native American Celebration Month. I just wanted to let you know tha the photo is not available or not showing. Please check and maybe it is an easy issue to fix.
    Thanks,
    Ken

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