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Working With Our Partners for a Healthier Future

First Lady Michelle Obama joined Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack at Parklawn Elementary School to speak with faculty and parents about the United States Department of Agriculture’s new and improved nutrition standards for school lunches. An important accomplishment of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act that President Obama signed into law last year. Also, in In February 2010, First Lady Michelle Obama introduced “Let’s Move” incorporating the HealthierUS School Challenge into her campaign to promote a healthier generation of children. USDA is making the first major changes in school meals in over 15 years. The new standards encourage fruits and vegetables every day of the week, increasing offerings of whole grain-rich foods, offering only fat-free or low-fat milk and making sure kids are getting proper portion sizes at the Parklawn Elementary School Alexandria, Virginia, on Wednesday, January 25, 2012.  USDA Photo by Bob Nichols.

First Lady Michelle Obama joined Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack at Parklawn Elementary School to speak with faculty and parents about the United States Department of Agriculture’s new and improved nutrition standards for school lunches. USDA Photo by Bob Nichols.

Wednesday was a monumental day for kids, families, educators, administrators, food service workers and the advocates who have led the charge and worked hand in hand to deliver healthier, more nutritious food to our nation’s school children.

For the first time in over a decade the federal government has made significant changes to school meals that will provide kids across the country with the nourishment they will need to flourish in school and in life.

We know that we would not be here without the leadership and dedication of school nutrition professionals from across the nation.

School systems across the country are on the front lines of nutrition, education and health.  They are as diverse as America itself.  But they share an unwavering commitment to the young people they serve.  Implementing the new standards represents a mission that I know school food service professionals have embraced with passion and energy.

We know that healthy and nutritious school meals are just one important piece of the puzzle. It’s going to take all of us – parents, community leaders, business owners – to make sure our kids grow up healthy and strong.

Today First Lady Michelle Obama, Secretary Vilsack, and I want emphasize our gratitude for the educators, food service workers and advocates. Without their tireless efforts to improve school meals for all of our children this would not have been possible.

4 Responses to “Working With Our Partners for a Healthier Future”

  1. Barbara says:

    Our food service staff work are very devoted,work hard and long hours to ensure that each student gets a healthy and nutritous meal everyday. I would like to see our food service staff be awarded money to celebrate the “Food Service Week” in the month of February each year.

    Which would include a Recognition Award Ceremony Luncheon with certificates and food service pins. And the students would assist with passing out the awards and the meals to the food service staff. Or the Luncheon Ceremony would be held at a restaurant where the staff could be served for a day.

    I want to thank Michelle Obama, Sam Kass, Tom Vilsack for all they do to encourage students to eat healthy in our schools.

  2. Alma Cundiff says:

    Thank you for all you do for our students. Love the fresh veggies and fruit.Our children like the fresh fruit and vegetable program snacks.

  3. Laura Kelter says:

    What a wonderful idea..I work in the public school and the food service staff are so devoted and caring. I see it everyday at lunch time. I think they deserve a day to be recognized for their work!!!

  4. Lynn Brown says:

    The keys to a healthy lifestyle are as much common sense as they are scientific. You should strive to maintain a diet that includes a wide variety of foods that contain a range of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, minerals and fats. When it comes to consuming these foods, think moderation and choose reasonable portion sizes. To improve long-term health, an active lifestyle is as essential as sensible eating. Activities that increase heart rate, like climbing stairs in lieu of escalators, have been proven to be essential to help consumers maintain weight, build and preserve strong bones, control blood pressure and reduce risk factors for heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and some cancers. Being physically active also promotes psychological well-being.

    http://www.sugar.org/

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