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USDA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Enter into Agreement to Improve Drought Weather Forecasting

President Barack Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack visited the McIntosh family farm in Missouri Valley, Iowa, on Monday, August 13, 2012 to view the drought stricken crops. The federal government has already taken some steps to ease farmers whose crops are growing poorly this summer, and the administration plans to spend close to $200 million on livestock, officials announced earlier in the day. The Department of Defense is encouraging vendors to buy meat to ease the crisis. USDA photo by Dave Kosling.

President Barack Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack visited the McIntosh family farm in Missouri Valley, Iowa, on Monday, August 13, 2012 to view the drought stricken crops. The federal government has already taken some steps to ease farmers whose crops are growing poorly this summer, and the administration plans to spend close to $200 million on livestock, officials announced earlier in the day. The Department of Defense is encouraging vendors to buy meat to ease the crisis. USDA photo by Dave Kosling.

USDA and other federal agencies continue to work to address the long term effects of last summer’s historic drought.

In the wake of a series of regional drought conferences with farmers, ranchers, business owners and other stakeholders, USDA is entering into a memorandum of understanding with the Department of Commerce, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), to improve sharing of data and expertise, monitoring networks, and drought forecasting efforts.  The MOU is a direct outcome of the regional conferences.

In recent months, USDA has partnered with local governments, colleges, state and federal partners to conduct a series of regional drought workshops.  Hundreds of producers met with government officials to discuss needs, and programs available to them. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack kicked off the first meeting in Nebraska, and additional meetings were held in Colorado, Arkansas, and Ohio.

Earlier today, Secretary Tom Vilsack addressed the National Drought Forum here in Washington, where he announced that USDA’s measures to open conservation lands to emergency haying and grazing during the drought provided as much as $200 million in forage to producers facing feed shortages.

The Secretary also announced a pilot program administered by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Kansas and Colorado to remove sediment from ponds to restore their water holding to previous capacities and he announced that NRCS has made available over $16 million through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) to farmers and ranchers for water conservation and wildlife habitat.

The Secretary also said that over the period of the recently expired Farm Bill, conservation systems installed with support from NRCS programs reduced water withdrawn from the Ogallala Aquifer by at least 860,000 acre feet.  This is more than enough water to cover the area of Washington D.C. nearly 20 feet deep and is equivalent to the domestic water use of approximately 9.6 million individuals for a year. These reduced water withdrawals have also resulted in a related energy savings of the equivalent of at least 18 million gallons of diesel fuel.

Secretary Vilsack said the Obama Administration continues to do all it can to help farmers, ranchers, small business owners along with local and county governments meet drought-related challenges.  “Now we know that the actions taken by USDA and other federal agencies at the height of the drought provided much-needed flexibility during a difficult time,” said Vilsack.  “We also know that drought recovery is a long-term proposition, and we will continue to partner with producers to see it through.”

For more information concerning available resources to combat drought, click here.

To learn more about drought mitigation efforts undertaken by USDA, click here.

Agriculture Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agriculture Service (FFAS) Michael Scuse (right) explains the damage to a corn crop caused by drought conditions to a reporter in Idaville, White County, IN on Thursday, July 19, 2012. Agriculture Secretary Vilsack has instructed Agriculture subcabinet leaders to travel to affected drought areas to augment ongoing assistance from state-level U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) staff and provide guidance on USDA’s new, streamlined disaster process. The U.S. Drought Monitor currently reports that 61 percent of the continental United States is in a moderate to exceptional drought. USDA photo by Jacob Maxwell.

Agriculture Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agriculture Service (FFAS) Michael Scuse (right) explains the damage to a corn crop caused by drought conditions to a reporter in Idaville, White County, IN on Thursday, July 19, 2012. Agriculture Secretary Vilsack has instructed Agriculture subcabinet leaders to travel to affected drought areas to augment ongoing assistance from state-level U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) staff and provide guidance on USDA’s new, streamlined disaster process. The U.S. Drought Monitor currently reports that 61 percent of the continental United States is in a moderate to exceptional drought. USDA photo by Jacob Maxwell.

One Response to “USDA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Enter into Agreement to Improve Drought Weather Forecasting”

  1. Pat Basham says:

    THIS ARTICLE JUST HIGHLIGHTS THE INEFFICIENCY OF HAVING ALL THESE GOVERNMENT AGENCIES INVOLVED IN THIS. AS EVIDENT, THEY WILL NEVER BE ABLE TO MAKE A DECISION AND SPEND MILLIONS OF TAX DOLLARS NOT DOING ANYTHING.

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