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Green House® Model Comes to Kentucky

An architect’s drawing of the new facility. Photos courtesy of Christian Care Communities.  Used with permission.

An architect’s drawing of the new facility. Photos courtesy of Christian Care Communities. Used with permission.

During my 12 years as state director for USDA Rural Development in Kentucky, I have had the privilege of breaking ground on many projects; from water and sewer infrastructure, to business development, to housing complexes and community-based projects. All have been notable and important projects for enhancing the quality of life and improving economic opportunities in rural Kentucky. Read more »

Urban Trees Store Carbon, Enhance the Environment, Provide Economic Benefits

A recent study by U.S. Forest Service scientists estimates urban forests’ trees store an estimated 708 million tons of carbon. (U.S. Forest Service photo)

A recent study by U.S. Forest Service scientists estimates urban forests’ trees store an estimated 708 million tons of carbon. (U.S. Forest Service photo)

Whether they are ringed by wrought iron or suspending a swing, urban trees are first and foremost trees. In fact, they are all working trees.

Consider, for example, carbon storage. From New York City’s Central Park to Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, America’s urban trees store an estimated 708 million tons of carbon, valued at $50 billion. Annually, these trees absorb an estimated 21 million tons of carbon, a value of $1.5 billion. Read more »

Responding to the Challenges of the U.S. Sheep and Lamb Industry

USDA is taking a multi-faceted approach to supporting the American sheep and lamb industry, working with researchers and market analysts to identify strategies and goals.

USDA is taking a multi-faceted approach to supporting the American sheep and lamb industry, working with researchers and market analysts to identify strategies and goals.

The U.S. sheep and lamb industry has been shrinking for decades as the numbers of sheep and producers have declined since World War II.  Consolidation of the sheep packing industry, higher feed and energy costs, continuous loses to predation, and lower consumption, coupled with competition from imports of lamb cuts, have taken their toll on U.S. producers.  In response to industry needs, USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) has been working with the American Lamb Board (ALB) and the American Sheep Industry Association (ASI) on initiatives aimed at ensuring the long-term viability of the industry. Read more »