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A USDA Loan Guarantee Supports Chesapeake Bay Restoration and Supports Maryland’s Oyster Industry

Holding a handful of oyster spat: It takes about two years in Maryland to grow an oyster. Standing next to Acting Under Secretary Doug O’Brien (foreground)  is Terrance Taylor, representative for Congressman Steny Hoyer; Letitia Nichols, Business & Cooperative Program Director and Michael Dee, President, The Patapsco Bank. USDA has guaranteed a bank loan that will help the oyster operation grow and also protect Chesapeake Bay. USDA photo.

Holding a handful of oyster spat: It takes about two years in Maryland to grow an oyster. Standing next to Acting Under Secretary Doug O’Brien (foreground) is Terrance Taylor, representative for Congressman Steny Hoyer; Letitia Nichols, Business & Cooperative Program Director and Michael Dee, President, The Patapsco Bank. USDA has guaranteed a bank loan that will help the oyster operation grow and also protect Chesapeake Bay. USDA photo.

Earlier this week it was my honor to join USDA Rural Development Acting Under Secretary Doug O’Brien and Patapsco Bank President/CEO Michael Dee to announce funding support for one of Maryland’s favorite delicacies – the Chesapeake Bay Oyster.

“In today’s environment, economic recovery is the driving factor in everything we do, and our support for this local food project will have many benefits,” O’Brien said. “It will help support jobs and businesses in the region and support an eco-friendly environment that helps restore and protect the Chesapeake Bay.” Read more »

Grazing Land Management Helps an Arkansas Farmer Reduce Effects of Extreme Drought

Dale Courtney (left) visits with Randolph County NRCS District Conservationist Adam Eades near an electric fence and tire tank watering facility about the resilience a good prescribed grazing program offers during a drought.

Dale Courtney (left) visits with Randolph County NRCS District Conservationist Adam Eades near an electric fence and tire tank watering facility about the resilience a good prescribed grazing program offers during a drought.

Cattle producers across Arkansas faced many challenges during the extreme drought of 2012. Luckily, grazing management strategies helped farmers like Randolph County’s Dale Courtney alleviate the drought’s effects.

With the assistance of USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, Courtney developed and implemented a conservation plan that included grazing management strategies, which helped to protect his operation from the worst of the drought and make it more efficient.

Following the conservation plan, he added electric fence and pipeline to funnel water to new tire tank watering facilities in each of his pastures. Read more »