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The US Forest Service Wants You to See Fall Colors – No Matter Where You Live

A surreal blend of colors harkens at winter yet provides peaceful warmth to fall on the Nez Perce National Forest in Idaho. While some may feel fall colors signals the end of summer, others see it as the beginning of the rebirth of spring. (U.S. Forest Service)

A surreal blend of colors harkens at winter yet provides peaceful warmth to fall on the Nez Perce National Forest in Idaho. While some may feel fall colors signals the end of summer, others see it as the beginning of the rebirth of spring. (U.S. Forest Service)

What to see, when to see it, and where to see it is what the U.S. Forest Service 2013 Fall Colors web pages are all about — making the colors of fall that much easier to find, appreciate and understand.

The glorious colors that come with autumn across our nation should not be missed. From New Hampshire to Arkansas and from Alaska to Virginia, and nearly every state in between, the changing shades of leaves from green to brilliant reds, vibrant oranges and golden yellows is a must see.

Fall leaves contrast with the marble stairs on the World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C. Urban forests also offer a plethora of colors as the season changes. (Courtesy Robert Westover)

Fall leaves contrast with the marble stairs on the World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C. Urban forests also offer a plethora of colors as the season changes. (Courtesy Robert Westover)

Every year the Forest Service updates and improves upon its Fall Colors web pages and this year is no different. Aside from the popular standbys like our toll-free Fall Colors Hotline that lets you listen to which forests and grasslands are peaking, and an interactive map that lets you click on the forest nearest you, we’ve added a map that will show you when the leaves are peaking in your state.

The new leaf peaking map is pretty simple to figure out. It’s color coded so green is for no change, red means leaves are peaking and brown lets you know the color is basically gone and winter is on its way.

Cities are also festooned with colors in fall as well. The Forest Service works with many municipalities across the country to help keep what we call urban forests healthy. These oases of nature in the middle of the hustle and bustle of city living are particularly stunning as the leaves of thousands of trees begin to change, set against the backdrop of mirrored skyscrapers, manicured parks and street lamp-lined roads.

The Forest Service also manages millions of acres of grasslands throughout the mid-section of the country from Texas to North Dakota. Seeing the tall grasses and wildflowers of fall is yet another natural beauty to behold.

So let the Forest Service help you plan your 2013 Fall Colors adventure!

Amongst the falling leaves, you might discover the frost flowers of dittany (Cunila origanoides). Its former light blue flowers have come and gone, its seed cast to the wind, but from the base of their stems you may be lucky enough to see what looks like curling ribbons of ice-- one last gem of their blooming glory-- a frost flower. (Courtesy of Kathy Phelps)

Amongst the falling leaves, you might discover the frost flowers of dittany (Cunila origanoides). Its former light blue flowers have come and gone, its seed cast to the wind, but from the base of their stems you may be lucky enough to see what looks like curling ribbons of ice-- one last gem of their blooming glory-- a frost flower. (Courtesy of Kathy Phelps)

2 Responses to “The US Forest Service Wants You to See Fall Colors – No Matter Where You Live”

  1. Thomas Fulton says:

    Wow-very beautiful-inspiring!

    Thanks.

  2. Dave Armlovich says:

    The Forest Service should have a fall blog for each forest or state that the public can use to report on Fall colors.

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