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Philadelphia Fights Hunger Through Academic, Faith and Community Partnerships

The Director of USDA’s Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Norah Deluhery, eats lunch with kids at a Philadelphia Archdiocese’s Nutritional Development Services (NDS) summer food service site.  The Center maintains integral relationships with partners like NDS to ensure disadvantaged children don’t go hungry when school is out.

The Director of USDA’s Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Norah Deluhery, eats lunch with kids at a Philadelphia Archdiocese’s Nutritional Development Services (NDS) summer food service site. The Center maintains integral relationships with partners like NDS to ensure disadvantaged children don’t go hungry when school is out.

The City of Brotherly Love puts its motto into practice. I saw this firsthand when I travelled to Philadelphia to meet with a network of community leaders who partner with USDA through its Summer Food Service Program. With this program, USDA subsidizes nutritious summer lunches for students who need them and works with community partners to deliver those meals.

In Philadelphia, about 22% of children live in households that have trouble putting enough food on the table for every member of the family. That means when school is out, and school meals are not available, many kids are vulnerable. The Summer Food Service Program plays a critical role in making sure kids have access to nutritious meals so that they can begin the school year well nourished and alert.  My friend and former director of the White House’s Office of Faith Based and Community Initiatives during the George W. Bush Administration, Professor John DiIulio, invited me to Philadelphia where he currently works at the University of Pennsylvania’s Fox Leadership Program.

The Fox Leadership Program’s mission is to equip and encourage undergraduates to be public-spirited, results-oriented leaders. The program’s service component offers a variety of opportunities for student engagement, including an option at the Philadelphia Archdiocese’s Nutritional Development Services (NDS).  NDS has over 450 sites providing summer meals to kids through USDA’s Summer Food Service Program. This summer, I had the opportunity to visit one of the NDS sites, the Salvation Army’s Learning Zone. There, more than 100 kids were enjoying nutritious food, a safe environment, and fun in the site’s gymnasium.  During the summer of 2012, they served over 875,000 free summer meals and worked diligently to dramatically increase those numbers this past summer.

Americans can be proud of the fact that programs like the Summer Food Service Program have strong support across administrations, and we can learn a great deal from the success of partnerships like the ones in Philadelphia.  As we prepare for the summer of 2014, we will look to networks like this one to inspire and to challenge us.

Two little girls enjoy a nutritious meal at one of the Philadelphia Archdiocese’s Nutritional Development Services 450 summer food service sites.

Two little girls enjoy a nutritious meal at one of the Philadelphia Archdiocese’s Nutritional Development Services 450 summer food service sites.

One Response to “Philadelphia Fights Hunger Through Academic, Faith and Community Partnerships”

  1. Sydney Teal says:

    I think this is a great program. It helps families and children that need assistance in getting food over the summer. It also helps college undergraduate students get involved in actively serving and giving back to their community. While 22% of Philadelphia’s families need help providing food for their families, there are many other cities that could benefit from programs like this. Since this program has broad support from administrations and businesses, much can be done to share information about this program. This would help similar large programs begin in other large cities or communities. If these programs could be federally or state funded, they could help many children and families.

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