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Made in Rural America: Helping Appalachian Business Sell to the World

When President Obama signed the Food Farm and Jobs Act on February 7th he directed his Administration, working through the White House Rural Council, to lead a new “Made in Rural America” export and investment initiative. Specifically, the President has instructed his Rural Council – in coordination with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Commerce, the Small Business Administration, the Export-Import Bank, the Office of the United States Trade Representative, and other agencies – to commit to connecting more rural businesses of all types to export information and assistance.

One example of what USDA will do in support of the Made In Rural America export and investment initiative is host training sessions to equip local USDA Rural Development staff in all 50 states plus territories with the tools they need to counsel businesses on export opportunities and resources. The Department of Commerce, through the Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee, will cross-train USDA Rural Development staff so they can better deliver support or refer rural businesses to federal services.

The blog below, cross-posted from the White House Rural Council blog, highlights the impact that the Made In Rural America Initiative will have with our partners at the Appalachian Regional Commission. Read more »

USDA Northeastern Regional Climate Hub Gets Ready to Help Producers, Forest Managers, Deal with Challenges

Mt. Washington, in the White Mountains National Forest, NH. USDA photo by J. Knowlton.

Mt. Washington, in the White Mountains National Forest, NH. USDA photo by J. Knowlton.

If you work outside, you care about the weather. But if your business depends on the weather, you should care about the climate.

Those of us who have lived in the Northeast for years know that something is up with the weather.  It’s more changeable; too wet one month, too dry the next.  Spring is coming earlier but late frosts linger and fall seems to stretch on.  This year’s cold winter reminds us of what winters used to be like. Read more »

White Mountain National Forest Celebrates its History

Peaceful solace is offered along a lakeshore in the White Mountain National Forest in Maine. It would be difficult for a traveler not to find a site worthy of a great painting or a great photograph. USDA Photo by Bob Nichols.

Peaceful solace is offered along a lakeshore in the White Mountain National Forest in Maine. It would be difficult for a traveler not to find a site worthy of a great painting or a great photograph. USDA Photo by Bob Nichols.

On Jan. 2, 1914, the federal government bought a 7,000-acre parcel in Benton, N.H. from E. Bertram Pike at a price of $13.25 per acre.

“We’re commemorating the first acquisition of what became the White Mountain National Forest, one of New Hampshire’s jewels,” said David Govatski, a retired Forest Service forester, who worked on the White Mountain.

Four years after the first parcel of land was purchased and the government had acquired more acreage, President Woodrow Wilson formally established the White Mountain National Forest. Read more »

Nanotechnology to be Discussed at Outlook Forum

USDA Agricultural Outlook Forum: The Changing Face of Agriculture logo

USDA Agricultural Outlook Forum: The Changing Face of Agriculture logo

This post is part of the Science Tuesday feature series on the USDA blog. Check back each week as we showcase stories and news from USDA’s rich science and research portfolio.

Say it: nanotechnology.

The word alone sounds intriguing, futuristic. But what is nanotechnology?

In simple terms, nanotechnology is understanding and controlling matter on a molecular scale—at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers. Read more »

Illinois Dairy Farm’s Waste Storage Gets a Makeover with USDA’s Help

NRCS District Conservationist Lewis Nichols (left) worked with Illinois rancher James “Jim” Johnson and his son Thad on a comprehensive nutrient management plan to best use manure on their land. USDA photo.

NRCS District Conservationist Lewis Nichols (left) worked with Illinois rancher James “Jim” Johnson and his son Thad on a comprehensive nutrient management plan to best use manure on their land. USDA photo.

A dairy cow can produce up to 140 pounds of manure in a day. So for James “Jim” Johnson, who owns 150 dairy cows on his Boone County, Ill. ranch, that means 7.7 million pounds of manure per year. Where does this manure go?

On many ranches, manure is stored and filtrated in a waste lagoon. But after a heavy rain in 2011 caused Johnson’s waste lagoon to overflow onto a nearby road, Johnson sought help to prevent it from happening again. In an effort to protect the quality of water and soil, he worked with the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to find a solution.

NRCS assessed his operation and developed a comprehensive nutrient management plan. The assessment and plan helped Johnson to change his barns to properly handle the storage and flow of manure. Read more »

It All Starts with a Seed

AMS ensures that seed shipped in interstate commerce are labeled and advertised truthfully.  This allows seed buyers to make informed choices and promotes fair competition within the industry.

AMS ensures that seed shipped in interstate commerce are labeled and advertised truthfully. This allows seed buyers to make informed choices and promotes fair competition within the industry.

Believe it or not, food doesn’t come from the refrigerator or even the kitchen.  It doesn’t even come from the grocery store or the farmer.  All food—whether meat, grain, vegetable or fruit—owes its existence to seeds.  Seeds are the backbone of human existence, providing us with the fundamental necessities needed for life: food, clothing, medicine, and shelter.

To protect the quality of these important, yet often forgotten, natural resources and to promote a robust U.S. seed market (current value of over $7.3 billion), Congress enacted a program over a century ago that would later evolve into what is now known as the Federal Seed Act. The act, administered by USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) in Gastonia, NC, is a law that protects American businesses, farmers, and the general public from misrepresentation when buying seed. Read more »