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Category: Environment

Five Cs of Arizona

American Indian operators run more than half of all farms in AZ, according to the 2012 Census of Agriculture. Check back next week for another close-up of another state’s agriculture scene from the 2012 Census.

American Indian operators run more than half of all farms in AZ, according to the 2012 Census of Agriculture. Check back next week for another close-up of another state’s agriculture scene from the 2012 Census.

The Census of Agriculture is the most complete account of U.S. farms and ranches and the people who operate them. Every Thursday USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service will highlight new Census data and the power of the information to shape the future of American agriculture.

For decades, school children in Arizona have been taught the five Cs: Copper, Cattle, Cotton, Citrus, and Climate. These five C’s have been the driving force behind Arizona’s economy, and gave economic security to past generations and hope to many generations. However, all that is changing. Arizona, like the rest of the country, is undergoing an economic transformation. Arizona is moving from a mining and agriculturally oriented economy, to a high-technology and service-based economy. This is changing the patterns of where Arizonans live and work.

Three of Arizona’s Cs – cattle, cotton, and citrus – were counted in the most recent Census of Agriculture and the results showed that they are still economically significant. The value of cattle, cotton and citrus production that was sold in 2012 totaled nearly $940 million, excluding the more than $760 million in milk sales. Total market value of all agricultural products sold topped $3.7 billion. Read more »

USDA Market News – Enhancing Customer Experience

USDA Market News is continuously changing to meet the needs of the dynamic agricultural industry and the data users that we serve.

USDA Market News is continuously changing to meet the needs of the dynamic agricultural industry and the data users that we serve.

Farmers, producers and other agricultural stakeholders depend on USDA Market News data to get the information they need when they need it.  They use the data to evaluate market conditions and trends, make purchasing decisions, and assess movement of agricultural products across the globe.  USDA Market News is continuously changing to meet the needs of the dynamic agricultural industry and the data users that we serve.  Now they can enjoy an enhanced experience.

USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) has released an innovative version of the Market News Portal (website) with simplified navigation, giving users easier, more logical access to the wealth of timely and reliable data available to make better informed decisions – or to compete smarter. Read more »

Iowa – the Land of Corn and Soybeans (and More!)

Farmers in The Hawkeye State produced more than $17.3 billion worth of crops in 2012 and lead the nation in acres planted to corn. Check back next Thursday as we take a look at another state and the 2012 Census of Agriculture.

Farmers in The Hawkeye State produced more than $17.3 billion worth of crops in 2012 and lead the nation in acres planted to corn. Check back next Thursday as we take a look at another state and the 2012 Census of Agriculture.

The Census of Agriculture is the most complete account of U.S. farms and ranches and the people who operate them. Every Thursday USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service will highlight new Census data and the power of the information to shape the future of American agriculture.

If you take a drive through Iowa, there is no way you can miss our beautiful farms all around you. With the most recent Census of Agriculture counting more than 30.6 million acres of land dedicated to farming, agriculture is truly at the core of Iowa.

Iowa farmers produced more than $17.3 billion worth of crops in 2012, with corn and soybeans making up the largest portion of the state’s agriculture. Our farmers have been leading the nation in production of these two key crops for decades. In 2012, Iowa growers tended to more than 13.7 million acres of corn and more than 9.3 million acres of soybean fields, ranking number one in the nation.  Read more »

Re-establishing Tribal Biodiversity through Agroforestry

 

Ron Reed of the Karuk Food Crew collects gooseberries. Photo credit: Colleen Rossier

Ron Reed of the Karuk Food Crew collects gooseberries. Photo credit: Colleen Rossier

Ron Reed of the Karuk Food Crew collects gooseberries. Photo credit: Colleen Rossier

Ron Reed of the Karuk Food Crew collects gooseberries. Photo credit: Colleen Rossier

 

The Karuk and Yurok Tribes traditionally managed entire watersheds and ecosystems on their ancestral lands to meet their dietary, cultural and spiritual needs. The Tribes are now working with University of California -Berkeley, University of California -Davis, the U.S. Forest Service and other agencies to reestablish the once rich and bio-diverse ecology of their ancestral homeland forests and waterways using traditional agroforestry management systems.

“By putting fire back on the landscape, we intend to restore the currently wildfire-prone food desert into a healthy, bio-diverse, fruit, nut and wildlife-rich forest,” said Karuk Department of Natural Resources Director Leaf Hillman. Read more »

Happy Birthday to Washington State!

With your senses set, imagine the smell of acres of apples.  Anticipate their crunch and sweet taste, or think of a baking apple pie – and then thank Washington State because they produce almost half of the apples grown in the United States.  Check back next week for another state highlight from the 2012 Census of Agriculture!

With your senses set, imagine the smell of acres of apples. Anticipate their crunch and sweet taste, or think of a baking apple pie – and then thank Washington State because they produce almost half of the apples grown in the United States. Check back next week for another state highlight from the 2012 Census of Agriculture!

The Census of Agriculture is the most complete account of U.S. farms and ranches and the people who operate them. Every Thursday USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service will highlight new Census data and the power of the information to shape the future of American agriculture.

Just a couple of days ago, on November 11, Washington celebrated its 125th anniversary of statehood, and farming has been one of the cornerstones of the Evergreen State since the very beginning. Using new information from the Washington Department of Agriculture, which is spotlighting farms that have been in the same family since before statehood, combined with the Census of Agriculture, we can easily see this connection.

The 1890 Census of Agriculture reported that apples were already Washington’s top fruit and the state’s dryland wheat farms were tremendously productive. Our farmers stay true to this tradition to this very day. Almost half of all apples grown in the United States come from our state. The 2012 Census of Agriculture counted nearly 175,000 acres of apple orchards in Washington. Read more »

Secretary’s Column: In Rural America, Promise and Opportunity Abound for Veterans

Veterans have sacrificed dearly to keep this country safe. Every day, they confront and triumph over those that threaten our national security. We owe it to our military men and women to ensure a different kind of security is waiting when they return home—the security that comes from the promise of a good job, affordable housing, a quality education and dependable health care.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture stands proudly alongside those who have served. Our staff across America includes more than 11,000 veterans – and our team works hard every day to strengthen services and programs in rural areas that support veterans and their families as they achieve their dreams. This includes everything from health clinics and telemedicine services, to distance learning and training opportunities for those who want to start a farm or ranch to grants and loans to help veterans start or expand a rural business. Read more »