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Category: Forestry

Before You Slice the Turkey, Give Thanks to Those Wild Cousins

The Rio Grande wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) calls the central plains states home. They live in brush areas near streams and rivers or mesquite, pine and scrub oak forests. (Courtesy National Wild Turkey Federation)

The Rio Grande wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) calls the central plains states home. They live in brush areas near streams and rivers or mesquite, pine and scrub oak forests. (Courtesy National Wild Turkey Federation)

According to USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service, the U.S. is the world’s largest turkey producer and largest exporter of turkey products. An estimated 46 million turkeys will show up on American tables this holiday, and most of those will come from turkey production facilities.

A much smaller percentage featured on the holiday table will be wild turkeys hunted on private and public lands. There are more than 7 million wild turkeys roaming the countryside, but their numbers were not always that robust. According to the National Wild Turkey Federation, which partners with the U.S. Forest Service, the tasty game bird native to the U.S. faced extinction in the 1930s. Read more »

Millennial Trains Project: Forest Service Employee Shares Lessons-Promotes Careers in Public Service

Michaela Hall, a workforce program specialist for the U.S. Forest Service, leads an educational activity to explain how important the sun is to plant life during a National Get Outdoors Day Event held in Washington, D.C.  (U.S. Forest Service photo/Victor Fowler)

Michaela Hall, a workforce program specialist for the U.S. Forest Service, leads an educational activity to explain how important the sun is to plant life during a National Get Outdoors Day Event held in Washington, D.C. (U.S. Forest Service photo/Victor Fowler)

The Millennial Train Project involves transcontinental train journeys for diverse groups of young innovators to explore America's new frontiers. (Courtesy Millennial Trains Project. Used with permission)

The Millennial Train Project involves transcontinental train journeys for diverse groups of young innovators to explore America's new frontiers. (Courtesy Millennial Trains Project. Used with permission)

Of all the places I expected to have a life-changing experience, I would never have guessed it would involve a moving train on a transcontinental journey with other young professional millennials.

But somewhere between Whitefish, Montana, and St. Paul, Minnesota, I realized that this journey would transform my outlook as a public servant. Read more »

Southeast Alaska Trail Crew’s Work on Footbridge Links Generations, Cultures

 

A new foot bridge near the tribal village of Angoon on Admiralty Island National Monument is part of a Tongass National Forest and Youth Conservation Corps partnership. From left, Tribal Liaison Donald Frank, Angoon Trail Crew Leader Aaron McCluskey, Youth Conservation Corps member Roger Williams, also an Angoon tribal member, and Admiralty Island National Monument Ranger Chad VanOrmer pause work to celebrate the bridge’s construction and the agency’s successful Corps partnership with the Angoon Tribe. (U.S. Forest Service/Jeff Miller)

A new foot bridge near the tribal village of Angoon on Admiralty Island National Monument is part of a Tongass National Forest and Youth Conservation Corps partnership. From left, Tribal Liaison Donald Frank, Angoon Trail Crew Leader Aaron McCluskey, Youth Conservation Corps member Roger Williams, also an Angoon tribal member, and Admiralty Island National Monument Ranger Chad VanOrmer pause work to celebrate the bridge’s construction and the agency’s successful Corps partnership with the Angoon Tribe. (U.S. Forest Service/Jeff Miller)

Moss and lichen grew fast on this Tongass National Forest recently built foot bridge due to the unique conditions of Southeast Alaska’s temperate rainforest.  Here, the annual rainfall is measured in feet instead of inches.  Some places get more than 15 feet a year. (U.S. Forest Service/Jeff Miller)

Moss and lichen grew fast on this Tongass National Forest recently built foot bridge due to the unique conditions of Southeast Alaska’s temperate rainforest. Here, the annual rainfall is measured in feet instead of inches. Some places get more than 15 feet a year. (U.S. Forest Service/Jeff Miller)

On a boggy section of single-track trail outside the Southeast Alaska tribal community of Angoon, two men are building a bridge on Admiralty Island National Monument that does much more than simply cross 10 yards of boot-eating muck. This unassuming wooden span is connecting generations, cultures and governments while symbolizing a shared path forward for the Tongass National Forest and Southeast Alaska communities.

The bridge and trail are a vital link in the Cross Admiralty Canoe Route, a 32-mile series of lakes and trail portages that allows backcountry canoeists, kayakers and others to traverse the island. But while the Civilian Conservation Corps established the modern route in the 1930s, the path it follows was not news to the island’s residents, according to Donald Frank, tribal liaison for the national monument. Read more »

Re-establishing Tribal Biodiversity through Agroforestry

 

Ron Reed of the Karuk Food Crew collects gooseberries. Photo credit: Colleen Rossier

Ron Reed of the Karuk Food Crew collects gooseberries. Photo credit: Colleen Rossier

Ron Reed of the Karuk Food Crew collects gooseberries. Photo credit: Colleen Rossier

Ron Reed of the Karuk Food Crew collects gooseberries. Photo credit: Colleen Rossier

 

The Karuk and Yurok Tribes traditionally managed entire watersheds and ecosystems on their ancestral lands to meet their dietary, cultural and spiritual needs. The Tribes are now working with University of California -Berkeley, University of California -Davis, the U.S. Forest Service and other agencies to reestablish the once rich and bio-diverse ecology of their ancestral homeland forests and waterways using traditional agroforestry management systems.

“By putting fire back on the landscape, we intend to restore the currently wildfire-prone food desert into a healthy, bio-diverse, fruit, nut and wildlife-rich forest,” said Karuk Department of Natural Resources Director Leaf Hillman. Read more »

Milwaukee Welcomes the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree, Salutes Veterans

Smokey Bear helps to decorate the U.S. Forest Service’s tree in Milwaukee’s Cathedral Square Park during the 2014 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree trek to Washington, D.C. (U.S. Forest Service)

Smokey Bear helps to decorate the U.S. Forest Service’s tree in Milwaukee’s Cathedral Square Park during the 2014 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree trek to Washington, D.C. (U.S. Forest Service)

Despite the rain and freezing temperatures, there was warmth and good cheer in the hearts of everyone who came out to catch a glimpse of the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree and help transform Milwaukee’s Cathedral Square Park into Community Spirit Park on Veteran’s Day.

The fanfare also helped to honor past and present members of the Armed Forces, some of who were on hand to see a holiday bedecked park with a 50-lighted tree, Milwaukee’s Color Guard waving American flags and a larger than life 90-foot tractor trailer parked nearby. Read more »

Volunteers Clear Weeds to Benefit Rocky Mountain Elk Habitat, Celebrate 50th Year of the Wilderness Act

Volunteers armed with shovels and picks remove clusters of houndstongue from a high elevation meadow in the Raggeds Wilderness on the Gunnison and White River National Forests. (U.S. Forest Service/Dan Gray)

Volunteers armed with shovels and picks remove clusters of houndstongue from a high elevation meadow in the Raggeds Wilderness on the Gunnison and White River National Forests. (U.S. Forest Service/Dan Gray)

The Raggeds Wilderness, a nearly 65,000-acre area on the Gunnison and White River National Forests near Paonia, Colorado, is prime elk habitat with herd numbers in the hundreds.

Acres of undisturbed coniferous forests are interspersed with open slopes of wet meadows thick with grasses and sedges, a nutritious diet for elk needing to fatten up for the winter. But houndstongue, a purple-flowered invasive weed that takes root alongside nutritious plants, is toxic to elk. Read more »