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Category: Forestry

When Exotic Fish are Away, Hawaiian Waterbirds Will Stay

Invertebrates are an important food source for native waterbirds, including endangered ae‘o (Hawaiian Stilt, Himantopus mexicanus knudseni) chicks. (U.S. Forest Service/Rich MacKenzie)

Invertebrates are an important food source for native waterbirds, including endangered ae‘o (Hawaiian Stilt, Himantopus mexicanus knudseni) chicks. (U.S. Forest Service/Rich MacKenzie)

Coastal wetlands the world over are known for harboring an impressive array of plants and animals. In the Pacific Islands, wetlands not only provide habitat for many unique species, including some threatened and endangered waterbirds, but also support communities of people who rely on these special places for food and other essentials.

Human development, agriculture, and rising seas are encroaching upon these wetland ecosystems and causing visible and profound changes. Another threat, less obvious to the casual observer, lurks beneath the water’s surface: non-native fish. Researchers with the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station’s Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry are studying the threats posed by exotic fish species and working with partners to battle the gilled invaders. Read more »

It’s Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month – Head for a National Forest

Kristin Merony and Tammy Randall-Parker, a Forest Service district ranger and a ski instructor at Telluride Mountain Resort, after Kristin’s first solo run down the mountain after a day of ski lessons. (U.S. Forest Service)

Kristin Merony and Tammy Randall-Parker, a Forest Service district ranger and a ski instructor at Telluride Mountain Resort, after Kristin’s first solo run down the mountain after a day of ski lessons. (U.S. Forest Service)

A new year means new resolutions and new adventures to embark upon. As many of you sit down to contemplate your goals of the year, I would like to suggest learning to ski or snowboard on national forests.

January is Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month, which means that on many resorts learning now can be the easiest and most affordable time to head to a forest near you. The U.S. Forest Service is host to 122 ski areas. The most visited forest, the White River National Forest, has 12 ski areas. Read more »

A Century of Skiing With the US Forest Service

A woman poses atop a U.S. Forest Service sign after 5 feet of snow accumulated at Berthoud Pass Winter Sports Area on the Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forests. (U.S. Forest Service/Jay Higgins)

A woman poses atop a U.S. Forest Service sign after 5 feet of snow accumulated at Berthoud Pass Winter Sports Area on the Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forests. (U.S. Forest Service/Jay Higgins)

For the third time, the 2015 FIS Alpine World Ski Championships have returned to the White River National Forest in Colorado, placing special emphasis on the importance of ski area development on national forests throughout America’s history.

Each year millions of visitors ski and snowboard down the snowy slopes of the ski resorts spread across the White River National Forest, and at ski resorts on forests across the nation – 122 resorts that together boast more than 180,000 skiable acres. The Forest Service averages 23 million visits annually to ski areas, contributing $3 billion to local economies annually and creating approximately 65,000 full-time, part-time and seasonal jobs. Read more »

Allegheny Helps Protect a Special Rattler’s Home

A timber rattlesnake captured in a tube will be fitted with a transmitter in order to discover and protect new dens. (U.S. Forest Service)

A timber rattlesnake captured in a tube will be fitted with a transmitter in order to discover and protect new dens. (U.S. Forest Service)

Throughout history, literature and movies, snakes have taken a hit in the public relations department. Think of Cleopatra and the legend of the deadly asp, or the various snakes so feared by a seemingly fearless Indiana Jones in a series of movies by the same name. Then, there is “Snakes on a Plane,” a horrifying look at being stuck on an airplane thousands of feet over the Pacific Ocean as hundreds of deadly and poisonous snakes crawl about.

Not surprisingly, ophidiophobia is rather common. But the fear of snakes in many cases is unwarranted and based on misinformation. Read more »

Downhill Thrill: The Life of a Snow Ranger during Alpine World Ski Championships

Max Forgensi, lead snow ranger for the Eagle-Holy Cross Ranger District

Max Forgensi is the lead snow ranger for the Eagle-Holy Cross Ranger District on the White River National Forest and for the International Ski Federation Alpine World Ski Championships in Vail, Colorado. (U.S. Forest Service/Roger Poirier)

There is an amazing partnership happening on public lands across this country, and it’s been ongoing for nearly a century.

You may not know that large private companies operate ski resorts on your national forests and for that reason the U.S. Forest Service has snow rangers across the country responsible for a myriad of jobs on different national forests. Snow rangers may issue backcountry avalanche advisories or assist the ski resorts with the development of summer activities. Snow rangers coordinate other recreation events like extreme races, while balancing proposals for new chairlifts, restaurants, and snowmaking lines.  The duties are endless and dynamic. Read more »

Forest Service Unveils Web Application Identifying At-Risk Forests

The Forest Health Advisory System screenshot

Using pest and tree photos, tables, and interactive maps, the Forest Health Advisory System provides vital information on future risks to forests across our nation. (U.S. Forest Service)

As our nation’s forests grow older and denser they are at greater risk of attack by pests, which can devastate some of more cherished national wildlands. Healthy forests not only provide a beautiful setting for our outdoor activities, they are at lower risk for catastrophic wild fires, and are more resilient to changes in climate and to insect and disease attack.

To address myriad issues facing our nation’s aging landscapes, the U.S. Forest Service has developed the Forest Health Advisory System, a web-based application that highlights potential future activity of more than 40 major forest pests and pathogens across 1.2 billion acres of treed lands. Read more »