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Search: "Pacific Southwest Research Station"

Prescribed Burning and Mechanical Thinning Pose Little Risk to Forest Ecology

Prescribed burn at the Tahoe National Forest. (Photo: Steve McKelvey, U.S. Forest Service

There’s hot debate over whether or not to conduct prescribed burning and mechanical thinning (the manual removal of trees) in our nation’s forests. Supporters of these fuels reduction methods, which remove highly flammable undergrowth, argue that they help lower the severity of wildfires. Meanwhile, opponents say that the treatments can hurt the environment.  Read more »

California Neighborhood Comes Together in Urban Forestry Project

A Kids Zone added fun with face painting and other activities during planting at the Urban Tilth Edible Forest in Richmond, Calif. Other highlights were the community barbeque and a “make your own soda” used to teach children how much sugar goes into their favorite beverage.

A Kids Zone added fun with face painting and other activities during planting at the Urban Tilth Edible Forest in Richmond, Calif. Other highlights were the community barbeque and a “make your own soda” used to teach children how much sugar goes into their favorite beverage.

This year, more than 80 volunteers worked together to plant 20 trees, 117 native and edible understory plants, and more than 600 butterfly garden plants as part of the Cesar Chavez Community Garden Day celebration at the Edible Forest garden on the Richmond Greenway, a 2.8-mile trail in Contra Costa County, Calif. Read more »

Forest Service Scientists Awarded $1.4 Million for Restoration Efforts to Save Threatened Plants in Hawaii

This Hawaiian mintless mint (Haplostachys haplostachya) was once found on the islands of Kaua`i, Maui, and Hawai`i. It is now listed as a federally endangered species and is currently found only within the U.S. Department of Defense's Pohakuloa Training Area on the island of Hawai`i.  With the help of new remote sensing techniques developed by USDA Forest Service's Dr. Susan Cordell and her team, research scientists hope to find ways to restore and protect this and other threatened species on the Hawaiian Islands. (Photo: Amanda Uowolo, Forest Service)

This Hawaiian mintless mint (Haplostachys haplostachya) was once found on the islands of Kaua`i, Maui, and Hawai`i. It is now listed as a federally endangered species and is currently found only within the U.S. Department of Defense's Pohakuloa Training Area on the island of Hawai`i. With the help of new remote sensing techniques developed by USDA Forest Service's Dr. Susan Cordell and her team, research scientists hope to find ways to restore and protect this and other threatened species on the Hawaiian Islands. (Photo: Amanda Uowolo, Forest Service)

A Forest Service research team has received a $1.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Environmental Security Technology Certification Program to begin research using sophisticated topographic models to identify areas within dry forests that have the most potential for ecological restoration. Read more »

US Forest Service to host 7th annual “Virtual Summit”

For the seventh year in a row, thinkers and leaders from the U.S. Forest Service will team up with partners across the country to discuss sustainable operations affecting the agency.

The 7th Annual Forest Service Sustainable Operations Summit will take place in Sacramento Feb. 14 – 16. Hosted by the Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest region (California, Hawaii and the Pacific Islands) and the agency’s Pacific Southwest Research Station, the summit will be attended virtually by 90 percent of the participants from around the country. Read more »

Thanks to the Forest Service, A Tool to Lessen Bat Fatalities at Wind Energy Facilities

With the literal rise of wind energy facilities across the country in recent years, migratory bats have been affected and can die in the huge turbines designed to catch the wind—and, unintentionally, winged creatures that fly at night.

The new interactive tool referred to as the Bat Occupancy Probabilities at a Wind Energy Facility was developed by researchers from the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Research Station. It is designed to help wind energy facility operators make informed decisions on efficient ways to reduce impacts on migratory bats. Read more »

Resilient like a Fox

Rare red foxes are making a surprising comeback according to U.S. Forest Service scientists who have released information claiming that at least six Sierra Nevada red foxes, a species once believed to have been nearly wiped out in the 1920s, are roaming in the wilderness south of Yosemite.

Although there is another known small population in another region of California the new find of just a half dozen of these fury and foxy animals still makes the species extremely rare. Now experts are expanding their studies in hopes of finding more red foxes in the Yosemite area. Read more »