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Bringing You Food and Fiber to Fit Your Active Lifestyle

America's ag promotion groups are dedicated to helping fuel and inspire active, health-conscious consumers. Photo courtesy of AMS.

America's ag promotion groups are dedicated to helping fuel and inspire active, health-conscious consumers. Photo courtesy of AMS.

If you’ve learned how to cut a mango from a magazine article, read about new fabrics on a website or heard about nutrition research on almonds from a health reporter on TV, chances are one of America’s ag promotion groups made that information possible and available. From the clothes you wear to the food you eat, these groups are leading efforts to research and promote food and fiber that fits your lifestyle. Read more »

Commemorating the History of SNAP: Looking Back at the Food Stamp Act of 1964

President Johnson signing the Food Stamp Act of 1964.

President Johnson signing the Food Stamp Act of 1964.

On August 31, 1964, President Johnson signed the Food Stamp Act of 1964 as a centerpiece of his War on Poverty, which introduced numerous programs designed to improve the American quality of life for those struggling to make ends meet.  Due to the Food Stamp Act of 1964, the Food Stamp Program, now the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), became permanent. This action and others, such as the establishment of the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants, and Children (a program celebrating 40 years this year), resulted in marked improvement in the diets of the poor during the late 1960 and into the mid 1970s.  Media and public leaders like Robert Kennedy, Senator Robert Dole and Senator George McGovern shone a light on areas of America where hunger and malnutrition had previously been easy to miss, such as crowded urban centers and the tranquil rural countryside, and the programs responded. Read more »

From Community Eyesore to Community Asset

Ribbon-cutting at Kalamink Creek Apartments.  From left:  Melissa Horste, staffer for U.S. Sen. Carl Levin; Senior Vice President of the Great Lakes Capital Fund Tom Edmiston, resident Ryan Kainath; USDA Rural Development Mason Area Office Director Kevin Smith; Owner/Contractor Jeff Gates; co-owner Tom Lapka (USDA Photo)

Ribbon-cutting at Kalamink Creek Apartments. From left: Melissa Horste, staffer for U.S. Sen. Carl Levin; Senior Vice President of the Great Lakes Capital Fund Tom Edmiston, resident Ryan Kainath; USDA Rural Development Mason Area Office Director Kevin Smith; Owner/Contractor Jeff Gates; co-owner Tom Lapka (USDA Photo)

Recently, the community of Webberville, Michigan celebrated the ribbon-cutting for what had once been an eyesore on the outskirts of town.

Kalamink Creek Apartments in Webberville was built in 1987 through the USDA Rural Development Section 515 Multi-Family Housing program to provide safe, affordable housing for low-income rural residents.  One of the first things visitors see as they drive in from Lansing is the aging 24-unit facility. Read more »

International Food Security: A Look at the Next Decade

The number of food-insecure people in Sub Saharan Africa is projected to rise over the next decade. But modern, higher yielding crop varieties hold promise for improvements in the region's food security situation. USDA's Economic Research Service provides annual 10-year projections of international food security.

The number of food-insecure people in Sub Saharan Africa is projected to rise over the next decade. But modern, higher yielding crop varieties hold promise for improvements in the region's food security situation. USDA's Economic Research Service provides annual 10-year projections of international food security.

This post is part of the Science Tuesday feature series on the USDA blog. Check back each week as we showcase stories and news from USDA’s rich science and research portfolio.

Across the globe, how are low- and middle-income countries faring in the ability to feed their populations? The International Food Security Assessment, released annually by the Economic Research Service (ERS), is the only report to provide a 10-year projection of food security in these countries. Since the 1980s, ERS has been conducting research and reporting on food security in countries most likely to face food security challenges.

To assess countries’ food security, ERS uses two key determinants: domestic food production and import capacity. In countries where domestic food production accounts for a large share of consumption (many in Sub Saharan Africa and Asia), increasing output of staple crops is crucial to improving food security. By comparison, in countries that rely on imports for a large share of their food supplies (many in North Africa and Latin America), the capacity to pay for imports is more important. Read more »

Empowering Students to Make the Healthy Choice the Right Choice

The following guest blog is part of our Cafeteria Stories series, highlighting the efforts of hard working school nutrition professionals who are dedicated to making the healthy choice the easy choice at schools across the country.  We thank them for sharing their stories!

By Victoria Wittrock, Food Service Supervisor, West Central School District, South Dakota

I’ve seen a lot of great changes come about in the West Central School District since the implementation of the new school meal pattern in 2012, and I’m very grateful for the process we’ve gone through.

The changes in the younger kids have been the most noticeable. Exposing them to more fruits and vegetables has been really exciting. When we first began introducing new fruits and vegetables, I was surprised that some kids had never had cantaloupe or honeydew melons. Now, I go to the local market and I see students there pointing out fruits and vegetables and telling their parents, “Mom, Dad, you’ve got to try this!” The younger kids now ask me about proteins, grains, and what other types of nutrients they need. Read more »

US Forest Service Keeping Score on Climate Change

The massive Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska's Tongass National Forest is rapidly retreating. In this photo a developing forest can be seen above the glacier illustrating how the Mendenhall landscape is being dramatically altered by climate change. (Photo courtesy of The National Science Foundation, Durelle Scott)

The massive Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska's Tongass National Forest is rapidly retreating. In this photo a developing forest can be seen above the glacier illustrating how the Mendenhall landscape is being dramatically altered by climate change. (Photo courtesy of The National Science Foundation, Durelle Scott)

Day after day we’re seeing more impacts from climate change, and many concerned folks want to know what exactly their government is doing about it. In other words, who’s keeping score on what we’re doing as our climate warms?

With this in mind, the U.S. Forest Service has developed something it calls the Climate Change Performance Scorecard. The scorecard was created as a way for the Forest Service to measure how well it was responding to climate change and to keep track of experiences and best practices so others could learn from them. Read more »