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Posts tagged: 1890’s Historically Black College

1890 Historically Black Land-Grant Colleges and Universities: Ensuring Access to Higher Education and Opportunity for All

Earlier this week I caught up with Tom Joyner on the Tom Joyner Morning Show to announce $35 million in grant support for high quality research, teaching and Extension activities at 1890 Historically Black Land-Grant Colleges and Universities. Tom, a graduate of Tuskegee University, and I discussed how these additional resources will help support exciting new opportunities and innovative research at 1890s institutions.

These grants are just a small piece of USDA’s nearly 125 year partnership with 1890s schools to support cutting edge research, innovation and student achievement. Since 2009 alone, USDA has awarded $647 million to 1890s schools.

In addition to highlighting the great work of these universities with Tom Joyner, I also joined Congresswoman Marcia Fudge—a champion of education and an extraordinary advocate for underserved Americans—to announce the designation of Central State University, a historically black university in Wilberforce, Ohio, as a land-grant institution. Read more »

USDA, EPA Sign 5 Year Commitment with 1890 Universities

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack speaks during the 2012 Historically Black Colleges and Universities 1890 Land-Grant University Memorandum of Understanding Signing Ceremony on Friday, June 29, 2012, in the White House’s Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC. It has been150 years since the first Morrill Act of 1862, which was signed by President Abraham Lincoln. The action established land-grant universities in every state and territory. The second Morrill Act of 1890 provided funding to designate separate institutions of higher learning for blacks in those states that did not open the doors of their universities to black students.   USDA photo by Lance Cheung.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack speaks during the 2012 Historically Black Colleges and Universities 1890 Land-Grant University Memorandum of Understanding Signing Ceremony on Friday, June 29, 2012, in the White House’s Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Washington, DC. It has been150 years since the first Morrill Act of 1862, which was signed by President Abraham Lincoln. The action established land-grant universities in every state and territory. The second Morrill Act of 1890 provided funding to designate separate institutions of higher learning for blacks in those states that did not open the doors of their universities to black students. USDA photo by Lance Cheung.

One hundred fifty years ago – just two months after the creation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture – President Lincoln signed the Morrill Act, a historic measure that created the land-grant university system. Twenty-eight years later, Congress enacted a second Morrill Act to establish African American land-grant universities.

Commonly referred to as 1890 Universities, these schools have remained the custodians of access to and opportunity for higher education in underserved communities, as well as leaders in agricultural, environmental and public health studies.

Understanding the special role 1890 Universities play in preparing the next generation of American leaders, on Friday, June 29, we signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between USDA, EPA and the Council of 1890 Universities, an organization comprised of presidents and chancellors of historically black colleges and universities (HBCU), to help build upon their rich history. Read more »

Risk Management Agency Associate Administrator Tours an Organic Garden at a Historically Black College

Pictured, from left to right: student Barbara Clark Franklin; USDA Risk Management Agency Associate Administrator Barbara Leach; and Elizabeth Wattley, Director of Servant Leadership at Paul Quinn College

Pictured, from left to right: student Barbara Clark Franklin; USDA Risk Management Agency Associate Administrator Barbara Leach; and Elizabeth Wattley, Director of Servant Leadership at Paul Quinn College

As the Associate Administrator for the Risk Management Agency, I visit our offices in all parts of the country.  My recent trip to Dallas, Texas, provided an exciting look at a truly amazing agricultural program and astonishing new ideas at Paul Quinn College. Read more »