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Posts tagged: Central America

West Coast Forests Celebrate International Migratory Bird Day

(L-R) Joey Russell, a wildlife artist and the president of the Audubon Society’s Mt. Shasta Chapter and Klamath National Forest staff Greg Berner and Lauren McChesney look at waterfowl on Bass Lake of the Shasta Valley Wildlife Area.  (U.S. Forest Service/Sam Cuenca)

(L-R) Joey Russell, a wildlife artist and the president of the Audubon Society’s Mt. Shasta Chapter and Klamath National Forest staff Greg Berner and Lauren McChesney look at waterfowl on Bass Lake of the Shasta Valley Wildlife Area. (U.S. Forest Service/Sam Cuenca)

‘Tis the season for migratory birds to make their journey north. Forests along the Pacific Flyway, which stretches from Alaska to Central and South America, recently celebrated International Migratory Bird Day with educational activities, conservation efforts and birdwatching trips.

Staff from the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and the Forest Service’s International Programs hosted an educational event at Camp Casey in Coupeville, Wash., that attracted 120 people of all ages who participated in interactive activities where they learned about migratory birds. In one activity, attendees took on the role of migratory birds to learn about the difficulties the birds face during migration. Their goal? To safely reach their next stop along the migration route. The first round was easy, no obstacles. The second round, a hunter was introduced and with each ensuing round, migration became more difficult. Habitats started disappearing and predators started increasing, catching larger numbers of birds. Elders, teens and youngsters alike all participated in this lively, competitive game to learn just how hard it is for birds to migrate long distances. Read more »

Insects for Dinner? Potential Tool in the Toolkit to Achieve Global Food Security

As an entomologist, the notion of eating insects isn’t new to me. However, for most Americans, the thought can make their stomachs churn. And yet, maybe seeing insects on their dinner plates is something Americans should get used to seeing.

Yesterday, I delivered the keynote address at the Insects as Food Conference, which was hosted by the FAO and Wageningen University in the Netherlands. As director of USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), my goal is to ensure that the science we invest in leads to solutions to today’s most pressing challenges. One of those challenges relates to our world’s growing population, which is expected to exceed 9 billion by 2050. We need to find new ways to feed all people while minimally impacting the environment. This “9 Billion Problem” has implications for how we grow and view food now and in the future. Read more »

New Mexico Farmers Supply Local Food to Community with Conservation

El Rincon Farm’s high tunnel and crops of lentils, corn, Chimayó chile and other crops in Chimayó, N.M. Photo from NRCS.

El Rincon Farm’s high tunnel and crops of lentils, corn, Chimayó chile and other crops in Chimayó, N.M. Photo from NRCS.

Everything that siblings Adán and Pilar Trujillo do on their Chimayó, New Mexico, farm connects with the community. Their lettuce and chile peppers feed students at local schools. And they sell their rhubarb, rainbow chard and red Russian kale at the community market just down the road in Española.

Conservation work helps the brother-and-sister duo make this possible. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is honoring contributions made by Hispanic Americans like the Trujillos to our nation during National Hispanic Heritage Month, an annual commemoration held Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. Read more »

Are Frogs on the Edge of Survival?

The very existence of frogs worldwide is being threatened by a killer fungus. Photo Credit: National Science Foundation

The very existence of frogs worldwide is being threatened by a killer fungus. Photo Credit: National Science Foundation

A lethal fungus is killing frogs and other water-dwelling amphibians all over the world, but a team of international scientists led by U.S. Forest Service scientist Deanna Olson is working to understand why.

Olson, who works at the agency’s Pacific Northwest Research Station, and her colleagues have the daunting task of tracking the disease, known as the amphibian chytrid fungus. Unlike the clearly visible white-nose syndrome killing bats in the U.S., the frog fungus cannot be seen except with a microscope. That makes scientists’ jobs that much more difficult.

Since the discovery of the malady is so recent, scientists still don’t understand a great deal about the fungus except that it affects the skin and ultimately leads to cardiac arrest in amphibians. Read more »

FAS Helps Small Biz Find ‘Out of This World’ Success

Carol Deeney (left), Stonewall Kitchen’s international marketing director, and Stephanie Miller, Stonewall’s social media and marketing coordinator, man a booth at the 2012 Gulfood Trade Show. The Foreign Agricultural Service’s Market Access Program helps the specialty foods company participate in trade shows, which helps increase its international exposure and exports. (Courtesy Photo)

Carol Deeney (left), Stonewall Kitchen’s international marketing director, and Stephanie Miller, Stonewall’s social media and marketing coordinator, man a booth at the 2012 Gulfood Trade Show. The Foreign Agricultural Service’s Market Access Program helps the specialty foods company participate in trade shows, which helps increase its international exposure and exports. (Courtesy Photo)

When the astronauts aboard the International Space Station received a shipment of food recently, it included jam from a company called Stonewall Kitchen. Jonathan King and Jim Stott started selling their homemade jams from a folding table at a local farmers’ market in Maine in 1991. Today, their company sells specialty food products that are enjoyed all over the world, literally.

Stonewall Kitchen participates in the Food Export USA – Northeast Branded Program, which is funded by the Foreign Agricultural Service’s Market Access Program. MAP helps U.S. producers, exporters and trade organizations finance promotional activities for U.S. agricultural products. Over the years, the financial assistance from the program has helped this small business successfully export its jams, condiments, sauces and baking mixes to more than 40 countries across Europe, the Middle East, Central America and Southeast Asia. Read more »

USDA Works to Further Agricultural Statistics Worldwide

In Nigeria, NASS representatives Matt Deaton, Terry Holland and John Campbell worked with Kaduna State Agricultural Development Programme, National Bureau of Statistics Federal Department of Agriculture to develop a stronger national agricultural statistics program.

In Nigeria, NASS representatives Matt Deaton, Terry Holland and John Campbell worked with Kaduna State Agricultural Development Programme, National Bureau of Statistics Federal Department of Agriculture to develop a stronger national agricultural statistics program.

Today the United Nations is celebrating the first World Statistics Day, to raise awareness of official statistics, which are premised on the core value of service, professionalism and integrity. As one of the principal statistical agencies in the U.S., the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) has been heavily involved in establishing and improving agricultural statistics systems in countries around the world since the end of World War II. Read more »