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Posts tagged: coffee

Borlaug Fellows Gain Inspiration, Insight During World Food Prize

Emmanuel Amoakwah, a Borlaug Fellow from Ghana currently studying at Ohio State University, gives a presentation on climate change during the Borlaug Symposium at the 2013 World Food Prize on Oct. 16. Approximately 40 Borlaug Fellows and their mentors attended the annual event in Des Moines to network, meet members of the Borlaug family and high-level agricultural officials and this year’s World Food Prize Laureates. (Photo by Jared Henderson, University of Missouri)

Emmanuel Amoakwah, a Borlaug Fellow from Ghana currently studying at Ohio State University, gives a presentation on climate change during the Borlaug Symposium at the 2013 World Food Prize on Oct. 16. Approximately 40 Borlaug Fellows and their mentors attended the annual event in Des Moines to network, meet members of the Borlaug family and high-level agricultural officials and this year’s World Food Prize Laureates. (Photo by Jared Henderson, University of Missouri)

Every year the World Food Prize recognizes the achievements of individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food in the world. Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Dr. Norman E. Borlaug created the prize, which emphasizes the importance of a nutritious and sustainable food supply for all people.

This year’s event was held from Oct. 16-19 in Des Moines, Iowa, and also included a USDA-sponsored symposium for 40 foreign scientists from 23 countries (and their university mentors) in the Foreign Agricultural Service Borlaug Fellowship Program. Since 2004, the program has provided U.S.-based training and collaborative research opportunity for scientists and policymakers from developing and middle-income countries to promote food security and economic growth. Read more »

Shade-Grown Coffee Protects Puerto Rico Bay Coral Reefs

Shade-grown coffee helps protect water quality and coral reefs like this one in Puerto Rico. NOAA photo.

Shade-grown coffee helps protect water quality and coral reefs like this one in Puerto Rico. NOAA photo.

I work for USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, an agency that helps farmers voluntarily implement conservation practices on their lands across the U.S.—including land on my home, Puerto Rico.

I am extremely proud of recent NRCS efforts here to help farmers, ranchers and landowners make significant strides in conserving the Guánica Bay/Rio Loco watershed. This watershed, which is about 100 miles southwest of San Juan, is one of the most diverse and complex in Puerto Rico. Read more »

USDA Grant Helps Coffee Farmers Win Honduras’ Cup of Excellence

Members of the specialty coffee cooperative “Los Maronchos” work in the field at the coffee farm located in Las Vegas, Santa Bárbara, Honduras. Coffees grown by farmers who are members of this cooperative won Honduras’ 2011 Cup of Excellence and had received assistance through USDA’s Food for Progress Program. Photo credit: TechnoServe

Members of the specialty coffee cooperative “Los Maronchos” work in the field at the coffee farm located in Las Vegas, Santa Bárbara, Honduras. Coffees grown by farmers who are members of this cooperative won Honduras’ 2011 Cup of Excellence and had received assistance through USDA’s Food for Progress Program. Photo credit: TechnoServe

If you can name it, there’s probably a competitive event for it. For instance, coffee has its own competition called the Cup of Excellence. In the coffee world, no honor is more sought after. It is given each year to only top coffees from participating coffee-producing countries. Read more »

Hawaii’s Big Island Flavor Steams into the Canadian Market

The company prides itself on handpicking all of its coffee cherries. (Photo credit: Hawaii Exports International)

The company prides itself on handpicking all of its coffee cherries. (Photo credit: Hawaii Exports International)

Hawaii Exports International (HEI) of Honolulu has successfully introduced its award-winning Kona and Ka’u coffees to the Canadian market with the support of USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) office in Canada, the FAS-funded Western U.S. Agricultural Trade Association (WUSATA), and the Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA). Read more »

Donativo del Programa de Energia Para USDA Asegura la Continuacion de la Cosecha del Café en Puerto Rico

Cuando la mayoría de los americanos piensan en café, piensan en Sur America o Hawaii. Lo que no saben es que Puerto Rico tiene una larga tradición en la producción de café de alta calidad. Un donativo otorgado al dueño de una hacienda de café  por USDA Rural Development bajo el programa de Energía Rural para America (REAP) está ayudando a conservar la tradición.

El café llego a nuestra isla en el año 1700 y fue por mucho tiempo, nuestro principal producto de exportación. Algunos de los mejores café del mundo son producidos en la zona montañosa central en el pueblo de Adjuntas. La combinación de la altura, ambiente fresco, lluvia y suelo volcánico contribuyen a que crezca una variedad de café con un sabor exquisito.

José Otero-García, USDA Rural Development State Director for Puerto Rico, coffee plantation owner Jimmy Román, and workers at the plantationJosé Otero-García, USDA Rural Development State Director for Puerto Rico, holds freshly roasted coffee at the Hacienda Monte Alto plantation.

Un problema grande que tenemos en Puerto Rico es el alto costo del gas propano combustible que se usa para secar y tostar el grano del café. Recientemente, el Sr. Jimmy Román dueño de la Hacienda Monte Alto, hacienda productora de café vino a USDA Rural Development buscando fondos para comprar un horno especial para tostar café. El horno en vez de usar gas propano usa la cáscara del café como combustible. Pudimos otorgarles un donativo de $14,000 al Sr. Román y a su familia para la compra de los hornos.

Debido a este nuevo sistema de tostar el café, esta pequeña plantación familiar no va a tener que subir los precios del café por la fluctuación del precio del combustible. El Sr. Román me indicó que este sistema de tostado del café, va a estabilizar los costos de producción, preservando 15 empleos permanentes y 40 de temporada en la cosecha del café. Es un placer trabajar con el dueño de esta plantación de café, el Sr. Román y su familia  y asegurarnos en continuar esta larga tradición de la cosecha del café puertorriqueño, y que esta familia pueda continuar trabajando su tierra en Puerto Rico.

Por José Otero-García, Director Estatal en Puerto Rico de USDA Rural Development.

USDA Rural Energy for America Grant Helps Ensure the Continuation of Puerto Rico’s Coffee Harvest

When most Americans think of coffee, they think of South America or Hawaii.  What they may not know is that Puerto Rico has a long and significant relationship with coffee.  Funds provided to a coffee plantation owner by USDA Rural Development through the Rural Energy for America (REAP) program are helping to preserve that heritage.

Coffee first came to our island in the 1700s, and was for a long time, a primary export.  Some of the finest coffee in the world is produced in the central mountain range in the town of Adjuntas. A combination of high altitude, cool weather, precipitation and volcanic soil allows the growing of a coffee variety with very flavorful beans.

José Otero-García, USDA Rural Development State Director for Puerto Rico, holds freshly roasted coffee at the Hacienda Monte Alto plantation.

José Otero-García, USDA Rural Development State Director for Puerto Rico, holds freshly roasted coffee at the Hacienda Monte Alto plantation.

José Otero-García, USDA Rural Development State Director for Puerto Rico, coffee plantation owner Jimmy Román, and workers at the plantation

José Otero-García, USDA Rural Development State Director for Puerto Rico, coffee plantation owner Jimmy Román, and workers at the plantation

The one significant drawback to coffee production here in Puerto Rico is the expense of purchasing propane gas for roasters to dry and roast the beans.  Recently, the owner of the Hacienda Monte Alto plantation, Jimmy Roman, came to USDA Rural Development seeking funds to buy special toaster ovens.  Instead of propane, these ovens use coffee bean shells for fuel.  We were able to provide a $14,000 grant to Mr. Roman and his family.

Because of this new drying system, this small family-owned plantation won’t be forced by rising fuel costs to raise the price it charges for its beans.  Mr. Roman tells me that the drying system will stabilize production costs, preserving the 15 permanent and 40 seasonal jobs that the plantation supports.  It is a pleasure to work with this plantation owner, Mr. Roman and his family to help ensure that a long-established custom, that of harvesting locally grown coffee, will continue and that a hard working family will continue to work the land here in Puerto Rico.

José Otero-García, USDA Rural Development State Director for Puerto Rico