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Posts tagged: FAS

Absence Makes the Market Grow Fonder

USDA Market News reporter Holly Mozal teaches a Cochran Fellowship group from Haiti about our Market News database.  We capture data for everything from cotton, fruits, vegetables and specialty crops, livestock, meats, poultry, eggs, grain and hay, to milk and dairy, and tobacco.

USDA Market News reporter Holly Mozal teaches a Cochran Fellowship group from Haiti about our Market News database. We capture data for everything from cotton, fruits, vegetables and specialty crops, livestock, meats, poultry, eggs, grain and hay, to milk and dairy, and tobacco.

At some point in our lives, we all wonder what it would be like if we didn’t exist.  How would things be different?  Last month, American farmers and businesses experienced what it was like to live without USDA Market News.  While the markets continued to operate, we received several phone calls and heard stories of how so many small and mid-sized producers struggled without the valuable information we provide.

In the 100-year history of Market News, this was only the second time that the data reports were not available.  The reports give farmers, producers and other agricultural businesses the information they need to evaluate market conditions, identify trends, make purchasing decisions, monitor price patterns, evaluate transportation equipment needs and accurately assess movement.  The information, gathered by the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) and provided for free,  captures data for everything from cotton, fruits, vegetables and specialty crops, livestock, meats, poultry, eggs, grain and hay, to milk and dairy, and tobacco. Read more »

Borlaug Fellows Gain Inspiration, Insight During World Food Prize

Emmanuel Amoakwah, a Borlaug Fellow from Ghana currently studying at Ohio State University, gives a presentation on climate change during the Borlaug Symposium at the 2013 World Food Prize on Oct. 16. Approximately 40 Borlaug Fellows and their mentors attended the annual event in Des Moines to network, meet members of the Borlaug family and high-level agricultural officials and this year’s World Food Prize Laureates. (Photo by Jared Henderson, University of Missouri)

Emmanuel Amoakwah, a Borlaug Fellow from Ghana currently studying at Ohio State University, gives a presentation on climate change during the Borlaug Symposium at the 2013 World Food Prize on Oct. 16. Approximately 40 Borlaug Fellows and their mentors attended the annual event in Des Moines to network, meet members of the Borlaug family and high-level agricultural officials and this year’s World Food Prize Laureates. (Photo by Jared Henderson, University of Missouri)

Every year the World Food Prize recognizes the achievements of individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food in the world. Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Dr. Norman E. Borlaug created the prize, which emphasizes the importance of a nutritious and sustainable food supply for all people.

This year’s event was held from Oct. 16-19 in Des Moines, Iowa, and also included a USDA-sponsored symposium for 40 foreign scientists from 23 countries (and their university mentors) in the Foreign Agricultural Service Borlaug Fellowship Program. Since 2004, the program has provided U.S.-based training and collaborative research opportunity for scientists and policymakers from developing and middle-income countries to promote food security and economic growth. Read more »

Cochran Fellow Influences Food Security in Mozambique

Mozambique Minister of Science and Technology Louis Pelembe (left) meets with National Soybean Research Laboratory  Director Craig Gundersen and his son, Van, during the World Soybean Research Conference earlier this year. Minister Pelembe participated in the Foreign Agricultural Service Cochran Fellowship Program and has used his training to help address critical food security and develop agricultural policy in Mozambique. (Courtesy photo)

Mozambique Minister of Science and Technology Louis Pelembe (left) meets with National Soybean Research Laboratory Director Craig Gundersen and his son, Van, during the World Soybean Research Conference earlier this year. Minister Pelembe participated in the Foreign Agricultural Service Cochran Fellowship Program and has used his training to help address critical food security and develop agricultural policy in Mozambique. (Courtesy photo)

Promoting food security and agricultural development around the world is a key part of the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) mission. One way FAS does this is by providing educational opportunities to emerging leaders from developing countries through programs such as the Cochran Fellowship Program. Among the FAS-trained fellows who have gone on to great things is Mozambique’s Minister of Science and Technology Louis Pelembe.

Minister Pelembe was a Cochran fellow in 2003, learning about food processing techniques for soy and other commodities at Texas A&M University. He later continued his training at the University of Illinois National Soybean Research Laboratory and Kansas State University with the support of FAS’s Emerging Markets Program. Today, he’s helping address critical food security and developing agricultural policy in Mozambique. Read more »

USDA Employee Volunteers Are Back in the Garden & Community

(L to R) DC Central Kitchen in Washington, D.C. Rich Holcomb employee, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) Brian Lounsbury, and USDA, National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Dewell Delgado Paez stand with a bin of just washed bok choy that was grown USDA headquarters Peoples Garden in Washington, D.C. USDA photo.

(L to R) DC Central Kitchen in Washington, D.C. Rich Holcomb employee, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) Brian Lounsbury, and USDA, National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Dewell Delgado Paez stand with a bin of just washed bok choy that was grown USDA headquarters Peoples Garden in Washington, D.C. USDA photo.

Every week USDA employee volunteers pick ripe herbs and vegetables from the Headquarters People’s Garden and deliver it to DC Central Kitchen, a local community kitchen. So far this growing season more than 1,000 pounds of fresh food has been donated from the garden. This week’s harvest weighed in at 175 pounds and included 84 pounds of bok choy.

Our volunteers wanted to know what becomes of the food they’ve worked so hard to grow, pick and donate – particularly all that bok choy. That’s why yesterday morning they rolled up their sleeves in the Kitchen to learn how the food donated from the garden each week is made into delicious and nutritious meals. USDA employees worked alongside DCCK cooks to prepare trays of bean burritos (with chopped bok choy inside) and Spanish rice that are being delivered to partner agencies in the Washington metropolitan area, including homeless shelters, rehabilitation clinics, and afterschool programs today. Read more »

Online Tool Helps Ag Exporters Track Trade Agreements

The Foreign Agricultural Service recently launched an online tool, called the Agricultural Tariff Tracker, to help exporters obtain information about tariff reductions resulting from world-wide free trade agreements.

The Foreign Agricultural Service recently launched an online tool, called the Agricultural Tariff Tracker, to help exporters obtain information about tariff reductions resulting from world-wide free trade agreements.

The United States has free trade agreements with 20 countries around the world that expand export opportunities for U.S. food and agricultural producers.  To help exporters obtain information about tariff reductions resulting from these FTAs, the Foreign Agricultural Service recently launched the Agricultural Tariff Tracker.

“The tracker was developed in response to requests from the agricultural export community for more detailed information about export opportunities resulting from FTAs,” said Jeff Jones, a senior policy advisor with FAS. “Though we’ve seen significant expansion in U.S. agricultural exports as a result of our trade agreements, there will be even more opportunities for U.S. agricultural exporters in the future as tariffs continue to fall throughout implementation,” he said. “Providing more information in a user-friendly format will allow exporters to maximize the potential of these agreements.” Read more »

Spreading Sustainable Seafood Practices Overseas

Last month, the Foreign Agricultural Service office in The Hague, Netherlands, partnered with the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute to highlight the institute’s commitment to sustainable fishing and introduce its new sustainability certification.

There is a growing interest among European consumers in sustainable seafood. Many European retailers require their suppliers to demonstrate that their products don’t deplete ocean fisheries. Read more »