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Posts tagged: Forestry

Wildfires at His Doorstep Inspires Meteorologist to Develop a Tool to Help Firefighters

Shyh-Chin Chen is a research meteorologist for the Pacific Southwest Research Station in California. Having experienced wildland fire literally on his home’s doorstep at least several times during the last decade, he has a passion for developing new weather forecasting tools to help firefighters predict and combat fires more effectively. Here he is shown with the Firebuster web tool.  (U.S. Forest Service)

Shyh-Chin Chen is a research meteorologist for the Pacific Southwest Research Station in California. Having experienced wildland fire literally on his home’s doorstep at least several times during the last decade, he has a passion for developing new weather forecasting tools to help firefighters predict and combat fires more effectively. Here he is shown with the Firebuster web tool. (U.S. Forest Service)

Imagine a research meteorologist focused on developing the kind of detailed weather forecasts that firefighters need to fight wildland fires. Accurate, timely information is critical.

Then understand that he has faced wildland fire on his doorstep in Ramona, Calif., near San Diego at least three times since 2003.

Those experiences fuel the passion that Shyh-Chin Chen brings to his work to protect human life and property. Read more »

Let’s Move Outside All Summer Long

Unplug is a public service campaign of the U.S. Forest Service and the Ad Council.

Unplug is a public service campaign of the U.S. Forest Service and the Ad Council.

Summer is fast approaching but packing up the kids to head outside could be daunting, especially for those whose experience with outdoor activities is limited.

But don’t worry. With a little help and some simple planning, the whole crew will want to unplug and find activities that will invigorate not just the body, but the mind. The opportunities to show our kids how to eat healthy and be active can stay with them for a life time. Young children and the young at heart will enjoy summer days filled with picnics and outdoor barbecues that create great memories. Read more »

New International Wood Packaging Standard Stops Bugs Dead in their Tracks

Several hundred non-native forest insect species have become established in the U.S. Recent arrivals, such as this adult Asian longhorned beetle, have killed millions of trees and altered urban landscapes in the Northeast and Midwest. (U.S. Department of Agriculture/Kenneth R. Law, courtesy of Bugwood.org)

Several hundred non-native forest insect species have become established in the U.S. Recent arrivals, such as this adult Asian longhorned beetle, have killed millions of trees and altered urban landscapes in the Northeast and Midwest. (U.S. Department of Agriculture/Kenneth R. Law, courtesy of Bugwood.org)

This post is part of the Science Tuesday feature series on the USDA blog. Check back each week as we showcase stories and news from the USDA’s rich science and research portfolio.

Wood makes great packaging material—it’s inexpensive, abundant and versatile—but there’s one drawback: destructive forest pests stowaway in the pallets, crates and dunnage (wood used to brace cargo) used in international shipping. Over many years, international trade has resulted in the inadvertent introduction of many non-native wood-feeding pests and plant pathogens in the U.S. and throughout the world. Some of these non-native insects, including the emerald ash borer and the Asian longhorned beetle, have become highly invasive and caused serious environmental and economic impacts.

But an international standard for wood packaging material is slowing the inadvertent export of invasive bark- and wood-boring insects, according to a study conducted by Robert Haack, a research entomologist with the Forest Service’s Northern Research Station in Lansing, Mich., and a team of scientists. Researchers found as much as a 52 percent drop in infestation rates in the U.S., where the standard was implemented in three phases between 2005 and 2006. The study was published May 14 in the journal PLOS ONE. Read more »

Chef Art Kicks off Pride Month

Celebrity Chef Art Smith gives the keynote address at the 2014 Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender (LGBT) Pride Observance event held in the Jefferson Auditorium at USDA in Washington, D.C. on Thursday, Jun. 5, 2014. USDA photo by Tom Witham.

Celebrity Chef Art Smith gives the keynote address at the 2014 Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender (LGBT) Pride Observance event held in the Jefferson Auditorium at USDA in Washington, D.C. on Thursday, Jun. 5, 2014. USDA photo by Tom Witham.

Renowned chef Art Smith was the official guest speaker for U.S. Department of Agriculture’s observance of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month. Openly Gay, and formally the personal chef to Oprah Winfrey, Chef Art has made numerous TV appearances, and is one of the most popular chefs in the country.

The USDA and its agencies, including the U.S. Forest Service, was one of the first cabinet-level departments to recognize its lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender employees through the establishment of an LGBT Special Emphasis Program. Read more »

The International Institute of Tropical Forestry Celebrates 75 Years of Research Success

Ray Rodriguez, a collaborator from Para la Naturaleza, talks about the rural-urban ecotone and positive outcomes of community action as participants enjoy a birds-eye view overlooking the Río Piedras River Watershed boundaries in the San Juan metropolitan area, the final stop of an urban field trip on May 20 held as part of the Institute’s 75th anniversary celebration. (U.S. Forest Service)

Ray Rodriguez, a collaborator from Para la Naturaleza, talks about the rural-urban ecotone and positive outcomes of community action as participants enjoy a birds-eye view overlooking the Río Piedras River Watershed boundaries in the San Juan metropolitan area, the final stop of an urban field trip on May 20 held as part of the Institute’s 75th anniversary celebration. (U.S. Forest Service)

Scientists and community members in Puerto Rico recently celebrated 75 years of tropical forestry research with a diamond jubilee of festivities.

Last month, the International Institute of Tropical Forestry (IITF) hosted an urban field trip, where participants explored several field stations within and around the Río Piedras River watershed in San Juan, Puerto Rico, to learn about the watershed’s vulnerabilities and values in a social, economic and ecological context from Institute scientists and program collaborators. The field trip was led by Institute Director Ariel E. Lugo. Read more »

Trashy Life: Crayfish Turn Rubbish into a Home

Crayfish, like this Procambarus hayi are freshwater crustaceans, and live in rivers and streams. (U.S. Forest Service/Chris Lukhaup)

Crayfish, like this Procambarus hayi are freshwater crustaceans, and live in rivers and streams. (U.S. Forest Service/Chris Lukhaup)

This post is part of the Science Tuesday feature series on the USDA blog. Check back each week as we showcase stories and news from the USDA’s rich science and research portfolio.

To raccoons, snakes and opossums, crayfish look pretty tasty, and large crayfish will even cannibalize their smaller kin. Crayfish, which live in rivers and streams, need instream cover to hide from all their predators. They also use cover to find food, to shelter while incubating eggs, and to keep themselves from being washed away in floods.

Susan Adams, a fisheries research scientist for the Forest Service’s Southern Research Station, examined different types of cover in the Yazoo River basin of Mississippi to see whether crayfish used large pieces of household trash for shelter when natural cover was limited. Her findings recently appeared in the journal Environmental Management. Read more »