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Posts tagged: Forestry

The Science Behind Fire

Researchers preparing for the next phase in examining physical fire processes

Researchers prepare for the next phase in examining physical fire processes by adding the effect of a slope. Photo credit: Mark Finney

In recent months, we have all become familiar with images in the media of wildland firefighters digging lines, air tankers dropping retardant and fire engines dispersing water. You may wonder “how do these firefighters know what it takes to fight fire?”

The short answer is: research.

Before a wildland firefighter sees his or her first fire, they are given the tools and training on how to fight fire and its behavior. The information passed onto them is not learned overnight but rather through years of research. Read more »

Celebrating a New Employee and the Congressional Act that Made it Possible

Matthew Martin sharpening his chainsaw

Matthew Martin sharpening his chainsaw prior to using it to clear debris off designated trails and to remove hazard trees from recreation areas. Photo credit: US Forest Service

Last June was one for the record books as Matthew Martin achieved his long-term goal of becoming a permanent employee with the U.S. Forest Service, an achievement made possible via a new hiring authority being used by the federal land management agency.

A second generation Forest Service employee, one could say that forestry was in Matthew’s DNA, which is certainly reflected in the hard work he did leading up to his permanent hire as a Forestry Technician on the Wayne National Forest. Read more »

U.S. Forest Service Celebrates 50th Anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act

Passport in Time volunteers

Passport in Time volunteers use a wooden shaker to assist with excavations. Photo credit: Holly Krake

Signed by President Lyndon Johnson fifty years ago, the National Historic Preservation Act marked a fundamental shift in how Americans and the federal government regarded the role of historic preservation in modern life.

The U.S. Forest Service has a long history of protecting significant heritage resources, to share their values with the American people, and contribute relevant information and perspectives to natural resource management. Protecting these resources ensures that future generations have an opportunity to discover the human story etched on the landscapes of our national forests, grasslands and prairie. Read more »

Citizen Scientists Help Monitor Nation’s Watershed Health

Citizen scientist volunteer Kenny Moore

Citizen scientist volunteer Kenny Moore collects a water sample from one of over 60 project sites. All volunteers are trained to follow the collection requirements that ensure their samples can be accurately analyzed in the lab. They also visit the same site four times a year even in winter. Photo credit: Leanne Veldhuis

What do adventurers, microplastics, and your national forests have in common?

Water.

Our national forests and the glaciers, lakes, and rivers running through them form the headwaters for the majority of America’s drinking water. This includes many of our big cities and growing urban centers, even those that are far away from national forests. Because of its importance, protecting clean, abundant water is a priority for the U.S. Forest Service, and thankfully, it’s a priority of a growing number of our partners. Read more »

Cold War Heroes Honored by U.S. Forest Service

A vault filled with personal mementos from the victims’ loved ones lies at the foot of the Silent Heroes of the Cold War Memorial

A vault filled with personal mementos from the victims’ loved ones lies at the foot of the Silent Heroes of the Cold War Memorial. The marble slab that covers it is blank, signifying the secrecy under which these heroes worked. Photo credit: US Forest Service

The Cold War was called a war for a reason—many died in the defense of democracy and free markets.

To honor those who died in the Cold War era, which lasted for more than 40 years, the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest’ Spring Mountains National Recreation Area partnered with Silent Heroes of the Cold War and GO Mt. Charleston to dedicate the Visitor Gateway site, home to the Silent Heroes of the Cold War Memorial.

The new site is our nation’s first national memorial honoring the lives lost during the Cold War. Read more »

Following Water in the Rocky Mountains

Tom Brown hiking Chasm Lake

Tom Brown hiking Chasm Lake, Rocky Mountain National Park. Photo credit: Tom Brown

In cycling the Continental Divide in Colorado, you get a vivid picture of where much of our water comes from. During my long bike rides up there, I commonly find snow still melting in June. This snowmelt adds to streamflow that becomes our renewable water supply and my drinking water supply.

The part of rain and snowfall that does not naturally go back into the atmosphere becomes our water supply and it varies greatly across the United States. In the wettest regions, such as New England, precipitation is plentiful and about half of it ends up in streams or replenishes ground water supplies. Read more »