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Posts tagged: Francis Marion and Sumter National Forest

The Building Blocks of Forest Restoration Partnerships

A forest in a wetland

Isolated depressional wetlands are an integral part of the local ecosystem and often provide wetland restoration opportunities.

Is it possible to simultaneously promote natural resources conservation and the growth of businesses that impact the environment?  Yes.  One way to do so is through “compensatory mitigation.” Compensatory mitigation is the preservation, restoration and/or establishment of a resource to offset unavoidable adverse impacts to the resource elsewhere.

For example, a compensatory mitigation agreement created in 2013 helped advance conservation in Francis Marion and Sumter National Forests in South Carolina and business growth in the surrounding area.  Here’s how:  Under the agreement, three local businesses supported restoration projects that improved aquatic resources located inside the Forests in order to mitigate projects that had unavoidable impacts on wetlands located outside the Forests, typically within the same ecosystem.  The three participating businesses were: Duke Energy, Boeing, and The City of Charleston.  Unavoidable impacts to streams, wetlands and salt marsh were mitigated under the novel agreement. Read more »

Volunteers Restore Giant Cane Along the Chattooga River in South Carolina

Volunteers dig up giant cane from an area adjacent to the restoration site on March 24, 2012. They must be careful to keep at least one foot of rhizome intact on either side of the main stem for successful transplanting.

On the Sumter National Forest, the peaceful sounds of the Chattooga Wild and Scenic River can barely be heard over the clang of shovels and the squeaky axle of an old wheelbarrow.

A work crew is busy on the forest’s Andrew Pickens Ranger District but instead of building with bricks and mortar along this scenic stretch of the famous river, the work crew is restoring native vegetation along its verdant banks. Read more »