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Posts tagged: FS

Wildland Fires Recognize No Borders

Australia and New Zealand fire managers are provided instruction prior to a practice fire shelter deployment

Australia and New Zealand fire managers are provided instruction prior to a practice fire shelter deployment. (Photo credit: National Park Service / C. Boehle)

An uncontained forest fire burning in Greece, Germany, or the U.S. looks basically the same: they are all destructive. For this important reason, the U.S. Forest Service has a well-established international leadership role in wildland fire management.

The Fire and Aviation Management or FAM’s international program coordinates Forest Service leadership in wildland fire through three main efforts starting with support for international disasters. The next effort is mobilization of fire suppression resources in support of established bilateral arrangements, coordinated by the National Interagency Fire Center and finally through FAM’s international activities coordinated with the Forest Service’s International Programs Office. Read more »

Using Agroforestry to Help Pollinators Help You

A blueberry bush with a bumblebee

Blueberry bushes provide food for both bumblebees and people. (Photo credit: Nancy Adamson/ National Agroforestry Center.)

Today, farms in the U.S. are larger and have less nearby habitat to support bees than in the past, yet the need for pollinators in rural landscapes has never been greater. In light of concerns over pollinator declines, a Memorandum was released by President Obama on June 20, 2014, Creating a Federal Strategy to Promote the Health of Pollinators. Since the release of this Memorandum, USDA agencies have been taking additional steps to support pollinators.

One question many people are asking is: how can we incorporate more pollinator habitat into our communities, agricultural lands, and forests? Read more »

Collaboration is the Name of the Game in the Northwoods

Stephen Handler leading teachers through a field exercise at the G-WOW Changing Climate, Changing Culture Teacher Institute

Stephen Handler leading teachers through a field exercise at the G-WOW Changing Climate, Changing Culture Teacher Institute. (Photo credit: Cathy Techtmann, University of Wisconsin-Extension)

USDA celebrates National Native American Heritage Month in November with a blog series focused on USDA’s support of Tribal Nations and highlighting a number of our efforts throughout Indian Country and Alaska. Follow along on the USDA blog.

When you are faced with a big problem, it helps to have all your friends working together.

There’s a great example of this philosophy playing out in the Northwoods of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan between the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, an organization that supports the hunting, gathering, and fishing treaty rights of 11 member Ojibwe tribes and the U.S. Forest Service. Representatives of the Commission and Forest Service meet regularly to collaborate on a wide range of issues, including wildlife management, law enforcement, and youth education. Read more »

A Giant Christmas Tree’s 4000 Mile Journey from Alaska to Capitol Hill

Lutz spruce below the white crane arm in front of mountains and beside trees

Center, just below the white crane arm, is the towering Lutz spruce which will soon adorn the West Lawn of Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Photo credit: Chugach National Forest, U.S. Forest Service)

For over 90 years the majestic Lutz spruce stood silently in the Chugach National Forest near Seward, Alaska.

Hidden from most tourists, except intrepid hikers, the spruce, as high as a seven story building, would have aged in obscurity but for a stroke of luck: this Lutz spruce was chosen among the more than five million acres of the Chugach’s wooded forests to be the proverbial “People’s Tree” and grace the slope of the West Lawn on Capitol Hill just beneath the soaring white dome that unites both wings of Congress. Read more »

Volunteers Put Down Roots to Keep Kenai Peninsula Stream Banks Healthy

Fishermen on a backwater channel of the Kenai River

The Stream Watch Volunteer Program reaches out to many fishermen who congregate on the Kenai Peninsula each summer season for the annual salmon runs. These enthusiasts are fishing on a backwater channel of the Kenai River just downstream of the Kenai/Russian Rivers confluence. (Photo courtesy of Ron Neibrugge)

The river banks of the Upper Kenai and Russian Rivers in Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula are known to attract some of the most avid fishermen. In the last couple decades, they have also lured a growing number of citizen volunteers who are equally passionate about an environmental stewardship mission to protect them.

The diverse system of plants that grow along the two rivers and their stream beds control erosion and help filter and keep those waters clean. But over decades of use, the numbers of anglers visiting these special places have left their mark. Read more »

Bison are back and here to stay at the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie

Bison on the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie

Bison on the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie. Photo credit: Gary Chancey, US Forest Service.

Guest Post by Hannah Ettema of the National Forest Foundation.

It was like stepping back through time on the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie. Some 200 years ago, when bison prominently roamed the Illinois landscape, kicking up dust as they ran in the herd before settling against a back-drop of tall prairie grasses.

That scene from the past is actually part of the Midewin’s future as four bulls and 23 cows were introduced to their new 1,200 acre enclosure. The first to arrive were the bulls, one 2-year-old and three 3-year-olds, from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service at the National Wildlife Research Center in Fort Collins, Colo. Read more »