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Posts tagged: FS

#GimmeFive Ways to Boost Your Garden and Keep Pollinators Buzzing

A monarch butterfly collects nectar from a flower. USDA photo by Charles Bryson.

A monarch butterfly collects nectar from a flower. USDA photo by Charles Bryson.

The USDA’s People’s Garden team is joining the fun at the White House Easter Egg Roll today to introduce the crowds to some very important garden workers – pollinators. Bees, butterflies, bats, birds, and beetles are all crucial to sustaining plant growth, and in fact nearly two-thirds of the foods we often consume are pollinated by bees alone. Doing your part to keep these creatures healthy in turn ensures a nutritious food supply for you and me.

Honey bees are responsible for pollinating more than 100 crops and one out of every three bites of food Americans eat. These foods give our diet diversity, flavor, and nutrition.  Over the past few decades, there has been a significant loss of pollinator habitat and pollinators, including honey bees, native bees, birds, bats, and butterflies, from the environment. Declining pollinator populations across the country pose a threat to our environment, economy and human health, but supporting pollinators is not hard to do. Read more »

A New Interactive Education Module on Climate Change Effects on Forests and Grasslands

Screenshot of the climate change effects education module explaining changes in wildlife phenology observed and expected with climate change.  This section has an interaction that explores observed phenological changes for different regions.

Screenshot of the climate change effects education module explaining changes in wildlife phenology observed and expected with climate change. This section has an interaction that explores observed phenological changes for different regions.

The Climate Change Resource Center (CCRC) has recently released a new education resource on climate change effects on forests and grasslands. The CCRC is an online, nationally-relevant resource that connects land managers and decision-makers with useable science to address climate change in planning and application.  The CCRC plays a key role in the USDA Climate Hubs’ effort to help land managers (the Forest Service, other agencies, and the general public) understand and respond to a changing climate. Read more »

Tusayan Ranger District Achieves Goal of Zero Human-Caused Fires

Fire prevention specialist Bob Blasi works to contain a small wildfire on the Tusayan Ranger District. (U.S. Forest Service photo)

Fire prevention specialist Bob Blasi works to contain a small wildfire on the Tusayan Ranger District. (U.S. Forest Service photo)

In calendar year 2014, the Tusayan Ranger District of the Kaibab National Forest achieved a longtime goal of zero human-caused wildfires.

According to forest wildfire records, the last time the district had zero human fires was in 1965, exactly 50 years ago.

“Over the last three years, we have had a specific, written goal of reducing human-caused wildfires on the district to zero for an entire calendar year,” said Quentin Johnson, fire management officer for the Tusayan Ranger District. “Given that the district receives millions of visitors each year because it is located immediately adjacent to Grand Canyon National Park, we knew this would be an incredible challenge.” Read more »

Loss of Space Threatening North American Sasquatch

"The habitat to one of America's greatest legends may be at risk." - Thaddeus Guttenberg, U.S. Forest Service, Mythical Wildlife Division. Photo Credit: Mary Horning, U.S. Forest Service.

"The habitat to one of America's greatest legends may be at risk." - Thaddeus Guttenberg, U.S. Forest Service, Mythical Wildlife Division. Photo Credit: Mary Horning, U.S. Forest Service.

There are many reasons the U.S. Forest Service conserves open space. It allows us to deliver clean water, provide space for recreation activities and maintain wildlife habitat for a variety of creatures – most notably the North American Sasquatch.

While most people believe the Sasquatch to be a thing of folklore and urban legend, researcher Thaddeus Guttenberg, with the U.S. Forest Service Mythical Wildlife Division, recently confirmed that Bigfoot is every bit as real as he is. Read more »

Going to Great Heights for Data and Atmospheric Monitoring

Carita Chan was excited to get to ride in a Sno-Cat for the first time. U.S. Forest Service photo.

Carita Chan was excited to get to ride in a Sno-Cat for the first time. U.S. Forest Service photo.

What lengths would you go to for the pursuit of science?

That’s a question I asked myself when I had the opportunity to participate in data collection at the Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site with John Frank and John Korfmacher, Electronics Engineer and Physical Scientist respectively, at the Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain Research Station.

The Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site, or GLEES, is located in the Snowy Range of the Medicine Bow Mountains, within the Medicine Bow National Forest in Wyoming. The remote site’s 600 hectares (1,480 acres) are composed of a watershed located in mountainous terrain at 3,200 to 3,500 m (10,500 to 11,500 ft.) elevation. Read more »

The Greatest Good

I was asked recently what the Forest Service mission meant to me. There are three words that always come to mind any time I think about what we do … the greatest good.

Founder of the Forest Service, Gifford Pinchot said that where conflicting interests must be reconciled, the question shall always be answered from the standpoint of the greatest good of the greatest number in the long run.

Our mission is varied and complex, but the concept of doing our best for the largest amount of people is much simpler. We will always strive to do the greatest amount of good for the greatest number of people. Read more »