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Posts tagged: Gifford Pinchot National Forest

Looking for a Mother’s Day Gift? Take Her into the Woods

Mother’s Day is just around the corner and most of us have yet to find that “perfect” gift for mom. But don’t panic. Let the U.S. Forest Service help out.

You read that right. The Forest Service wants you to give mom the gift of nature in all its innate perfection. And all you need to do is take her to your nearest national forest or grasslands.

For instance, if you live in Washington State, the Olympic National Forest, with its dramatic mountain range, conjures up images of the European Alps. The beauty doesn’t end there, though. The Olympics’ varied landscape includes lush rain forests, deep canyons, high mountain ridges and ocean beaches. Taking mom on a drive through this incomparable backdrop would be a scenic tour to brighten her day. Read more »

NY Times Names Forest Service-Managed River in Washington a Top Destination

Used by kayakers and rafters all year round, including as an outdoor adventure by Joint Base Lewis-McChord members, the White Salmon winds nearly 45 miles from its headwaters on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest through steep, forested canyons into the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area and the Columbia River. (U.S. Army photo)

Used by kayakers and rafters all year round, including as an outdoor adventure by Joint Base Lewis-McChord members, the White Salmon winds nearly 45 miles from its headwaters on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest through steep, forested canyons into the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area and the Columbia River. (Photo provided by Wet Planet Rafting)

Dubbed America’s premier alpine whitewater river, the White Salmon River in south central Washington State was recently named as a top destination by the New York Times.

The White Salmon, used by kayakers and rafters all year round, winds nearly 45 miles from its headwaters on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest through steep, forested canyons into the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area and the Columbia River. Read more »

Mount St. Helens Videos Receive National Awards

A Forest Service scientists searches for signs of aquatic life in a lake within the 1980 blast zone of Mount St. Helens. Photo from the video, “Mount St. Helens: A Living Laboratory.”

A Forest Service scientists searches for signs of aquatic life in a lake within the 1980 blast zone of Mount St. Helens. Photo from the video, “Mount St. Helens: A Living Laboratory.”

Two new Forest Service films have been honored with prestigious Silver Telly Awards for excellence in non-fiction filmmaking. Read more »

Fort Valley Experimental Forest: First in the Nation to Discover the Effects of a Changing Climate on Pines

Back when Arizona was designated a U.S. territory, scientists had already been exploring its vast landscapes which start from nearly sea level and climb to over 12,000 feet. They were paying particular attention to Arizona’s diverse vegetation and climate.

In 1889, biologist C. Hart Merriam traversed northern Arizona and found six of the seven world life zones he would later describe by latitude and elevation. The existence of such varied life zones across a short distance, and often with just a few hundred feet of elevation change, fascinated scientists. One particular life zone, the extensive stands of ponderosa pine growing at higher elevations from west of Flagstaff, AZ, eastward into New Mexico was particularly interesting to scientists and foresters. Read more »

Hiking over 2,500 Miles up America’s West Coast

Alex Asai, civil engineer on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest in Vancouver, Wash. spent five months in 2011 hiking the 2,650-mile Pacific Crest Trail. Here Asai is on the Willamette National Forest in Eugene, Ore. (U.S. Forest Service photo)

Alex Asai, civil engineer on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest in Vancouver, Wash. spent five months in 2011 hiking the 2,650-mile Pacific Crest Trail. Here Asai is on the Willamette National Forest in Eugene, Ore. (U.S. Forest Service photo)

Not many people can say that they took six months off from work to hike from one country to another. U.S. Forest Service civil engineer Alex Asai did. Read more »