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Posts tagged: Janet Nuzum

U.S. Agribusinesses Shine at SIAL Canada Trade Show

Last week, I traveled to Canada – the second-largest market for U.S. agricultural products.  Wanting to see our companies promoting U.S. export sales, I attended SIAL Canada, an international trade show in Toronto, which welcomed more than 530 exhibitors and 12,000 food and agricultural business professionals from around the world.

While there, I met with the 28 American companies exhibiting in the USA pavilion, which was endorsed by USDA. Many of the companies were only able to attend the show because of support from the State Trade Regional Groups (STRGs) and the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) market development programs. Read more »

Trade Takes Center Stage at Agricultural Outlook Forum

Agricultural exports were at the forefront during yesterday’s National Export Initiative (NEI) session at USDA’s 2011 Agricultural Outlook Forum. Earlier that day, USDA Chief Economist Joe Glauber announced the latest agricultural export forecast for fiscal year 2011 (Oct. 1, 2010-Sept. 30, 2011), which set the stage for a lot of interest in NEI and a packed afternoon session. President Obama and USDA view exports as one of the key drivers of sustainable economic growth and job creation. That’s why, under NEI, President Obama set a goal of doubling all U.S. exports by the end of 2014. Read more »

A Taste of the States with our Neighbors to the North

Secretary Vilsack talks with U.S. Ambassador David Jacobson and Chef Dino Ovcaric about the U.S. foods featured during the tasteUS! culinary showcase in Ottawa.

Secretary Vilsack talks with U.S. Ambassador David Jacobson and Chef Dino Ovcaric about the U.S. foods featured during the tasteUS! culinary showcase in Ottawa.

This week, I traveled to Ottawa to meet with Canadian trade group leaders as well as Gerry Ritz, the minister of agriculture in Canada. As part of these meetings, we discussed agricultural trade issues that both of our countries face and opportunities for collaboration. In between meetings, I had the opportunity to participate in the tasteUS! Culinary Showcase. This event took place at Ambassador Jacobson’s residence and guests included Canadian media, buyers from Canadian grocery chains and food establishments, and U.S. cooperator representatives in Canada. Read more »

SIAL China 2010 Trade Show Opens in Shanghai to Throngs of Visitors, Demonstrating to the World how Trade Works

By Janet Nuzum, Associate Administrator for USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service

Today I am in bustling and busy Shanghai representing USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service at the SIAL China 2010 trade show.  SIAL China is celebrating its 11th year as one of the largest, most comprehensive trade shows for the food, beverage, and hospitality industry in China. Last year, SIAL China had more than 1,000 exhibitors and over 28,000 visitors. As China’s trade and commercial center, this city is an appropriate place to hold a trade show of this magnitude, especially during World Trade Week.

In addition to the opening of SIAL China today, Shanghai is hosting the World Expo 2010 from May 1 through October 31. This Expo may be the largest World’s Fair ever, with 70 million visitors from all over the world expected to attend. With that many people anticipated in this city of 20 million over the next six months, you can only imagine how crowded the streets already are and will be. 

I had the opportunity to visit the World Expo yesterday, along with U.S. Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke, who is leading a clean energy business development and trade mission to China and Indonesia. I was truly amazed by the size and scope of this unforgettable Expo that is spread over two square miles along both sides of the Huangpu River that divides Shanghai.

In preparation for the World Expo, Shanghai has transformed itself in less than a decade from an industrial town to a cosmopolitan metropolis. Its growth is indicative of the rapid changes happening in this country of 1.3 billion people. Since China joined the World Trade Organization in December 2001, it has lowered tariffs and liberalized its economy, resulting in rapid growth in gross domestic product, direct foreign investment, imports and exports. 

This growth means Chinese consumers have more disposable income to spend on food and clothing, which creates real opportunities for U.S. exporters of food and fiber. That is why I am here at the SIAL China 2010 Trade Show to see and learn about the changes happening in this dynamic market and what it means for U.S. agricultural exporters. As I walked through the U.S. Pavilion, I saw Chinese buyers from both the retail and food service sectors looking eagerly at the vast range of U.S. food and beverage products on display. U.S. exporters are here from all over the United States from Alaska to Alabama.  Their products include everything from seafood to pork and wild blueberries to walnuts.  What an exciting array of sights, smells, and tastes!

Last year, 42 U.S. Pavilion exhibitors made $2.5 million in on-site sales with another $17 million expected over the ensuing 12 months.  With 58 U.S. exhibitors this year—the largest we have ever had at this show—sales will undoubtedly be even higher.  The growing number of U.S. exhibitors is a testament to the broader awareness in the United States of the tremendous market potential here in China.

Earlier today, I participated in a press conference with Chinese and foreign dignitaries to open the show, which runs from May 19-21. At the press conference, I emphasized how much we value our trade and economic relationship with China. Currently, China is the United States’ second largest market for U.S. agricultural exports. Last year, two-way trade in agricultural, fish, and forest products exceeded $21 billion, more than quadrupling in value since 2001. Clearly, both of our countries benefit immensely from our vibrant bilateral relationship and exchange of goods and services. And the U.S. exhibitors here at SIAL China 2010 assured me that the prospects for increased U.S. exports look even brighter!

FAS Associate Administrator Janet Nuzum speaks with U.S. exporters at the Western United States Agricultural Trade Association booth in the USA Pavilion at the SIAL China 2010 Trade Show in Shanghai, China. Photo Credit: Bill Shen, U.S. Agricultural Trade Office, Shanghai, China

FAS Associate Administrator Janet Nuzum speaks with U.S. exporters at the Western United States Agricultural Trade Association booth in the USA Pavilion at the SIAL China 2010 Trade Show in Shanghai, China. Photo Credit: Bill Shen, U.S. Agricultural Trade Office, Shanghai, China 

U.S. Foods and Beverages Attract Crowds at Seoul Food and Hotel Korea Trade Show, Demonstrating Korean Interest and Demand

By Janet Nuzum, Associate Administrator for USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service

I am writing this post from my hotel room in Korea, because I want to share with you some of my experiences on my first day here at the Seoul Food and Hotel Korea Trade Show. As the associate administrator for USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service, I am here in Ilsan, northwest of Seoul, for several reasons. Among the most important is to meet face-to-face with exhibitors and business representatives who are here to sell American agricultural and food products, as well as Korean importers, food processors, and industry leaders converging at this event, the biggest trade-only food show in South Korea. Up to 1,800 exhibitors are here in this huge, 49,000-square-foot exhibition space. More than 35,000 visitors are expected.

May 12, was the first day of this year’s show and I was privileged to represent the United States in the opening ceremonies.  I joined Minister Chang, the Korean Minister for Food, Agriculture, Forestry & Fisheries (MIFAFF), as a dozen or so dignitaries cut the ribbons signifying the official opening of this year’s show. As Minister Chang prepared to depart the show, he and I had a moment to chat informally.  I was impressed by his warmth and sincerity as we both re-affirmed the interests of MIFAFF and USDA in working together cooperatively on areas of mutual interest and concern.

I then turned my attention to the USA Pavilion, which featured 36 exhibitors, representing a truly diverse range of U.S. food and beverage products including American meat products, fruits, cheese and a variety of other products. Last year, 30 U.S. exhibitors left the show with expected sales of $8.9 million in sales over the ensuing 12 months. This year, they hope to sell even more U.S. food and beverage products.  Even if the contacts made here don’t lead immediately to sales contracts, several exhibitors told me that it is nevertheless important for them to be here, to be visible with the trade and showcase their products.  Building a market presence is sometimes a long process, and participation in these types of trade shows introduces foreign buyers and consumers more quickly and effectively to the attributes and advantages of American products.  The exhibits not only showcase the U.S. products, but also demonstrate ways to use and serve the products, whether American style or adapted to Korean style.  Even the non-edible give-aways, such as the carrying bags with egg-head caricatures on them given out by the USA Poultry and Egg Export Council, are a visual reminder of the likeability of American agricultural products.

Korea is already a very important trade partner for the United States. It is the third largest economy in Asia and the world’s 15th largest economy. This country is an economic powerhouse. My presence here emphasizes how strongly the United States values its long, strategic partnership with Korea, which began 60 years ago. As I meet with Korean officials, buyers, and traders, I have the opportunity to reinforce that partnership.

Looking back on the response of visitors to the food and beverages displayed at the USA Pavilion, I am optimistic that the demand for U.S. agricultural products is strong and our reputation as a reliable supplier of safe, wholesome food and agricultural products is excellent. Our FAS staff here in Korea in partnership with U.S. cooperators, NASDA, the state and regional trade groups SUSTA and Food Export-Midwest, as well as innovative and forward-looking businesses, have done an outstanding job of showcasing American food agricultural products here. 

FAS Associate Administrator Janet Nuzum shakes hands with Korea’s Minister for Food, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Chang Tae-Pyong. FAS Associate Administrator Janet Nuzum shakes hands with Korea’s Minister for Food, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Chang Tae-Pyong.