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Posts tagged: Michigan State University

On “Bring Your Daughter to Work Day,” a Local Student Learns about Climate Change

Ellie Hohenstein in Michigan with Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. (USDA photo)

Ellie Hohenstein in Michigan with Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. (USDA photo)

Last week, Secretary Vilsack went to Michigan State University to deliver a major climate address.  Among those in attendance was 15 year old Ellie Hohenstein, a freshman at Annandale High School in Fairfax County, VA.  She provides this blog concerning her experiences as she accompanied her father to Lansing for the event.  Wayne Maloney, Office of Communications

Submitted by Ellie Hohenstein

My father is the Director of the USDA Climate Change Program Office in Washington, D.C. April 23 was “bring your daughter or son to work day” at USDA. I had no idea what to expect when my Dad told me I could accompany him on his business trip to Michigan. I knew I would get to watch a speech from the Secretary of Agriculture, but this was a much bigger event than I expected. Read more »

Forests a Fascination Since High School for Legislative Affairs Specialist

Katie Armstrong prepares to board the Glacier Discovery Train operated in partnership by the U.S. Forest Service and the Alaska Railroad. (Courtesy Katie Armstrong)

Katie Armstrong prepares to board the Glacier Discovery Train operated in partnership by the U.S. Forest Service and the Alaska Railroad. (Courtesy Katie Armstrong)

When Katie Armstrong read “So You Want to be a Forester,” like many high school students she wasn’t sure what career path she wanted to follow. So she decided to attend a summer forestry camp offered by Michigan Tech. After the camp she was hooked.

Then she set her goal on attending Michigan State University to study forestry.

“During my time at MSU one of my professors introduced me to urban forestry. I loved it so much I went back for a master’s degree in Forestry and Urban Studies,” said Armstrong. Read more »

Co-op Provides Help for Premature Babies, Generates Income for Moms

The creation of this cooperative and its clearly defined values is definitely an encouragement to myself as a mother, OB nurse, and woman. The future of babies, mothers, and families will benefit greatly from the MMC!” says co-op member Anna Marie Nieboer, of Kalamazoo, Mich.

The creation of this cooperative and its clearly defined values is definitely an encouragement to myself as a mother, OB nurse, and woman. The future of babies, mothers, and families will benefit greatly from the MMC!” says co-op member Anna Marie Nieboer, of Kalamazoo, Mich.

Note: This is one in a series of entries USDA is posting to our blog in observance of National Cooperative Month in October.

Mothers Milk Cooperative (MMC) is believed to be the first cooperative in the country that aggregates and markets human milk. The cooperative was incorporated in 2012 to achieve two major objectives: Read more »

Farmers go Digital to Confront Changing Growing Conditions

This post is part of the Science Tuesday feature series on the USDA blog. Check back each week as we showcase stories and news from USDA’s rich science and research portfolio.

American farmers have a long history of overcoming obstacles. In 1938, they helped the country emerge from the Dust Bowl by switching to contour plowing and eradicated the boll weevil forty years later by employing integrated pest management techniques.  In both cases – and many others – USDA was there to help farmers achieve success.

Many of the obstacles they face today are on a much larger scale, associated with climate change and seasonal weather variability. USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) is helping farmers get the tools they need to meet those challenges. Read more »

Have Fun Outside This Weekend – But Keep the Ticks Off

Ticks can transmit up to 14 diseases to humans – don’t let the bloodsuckers ruin your summer or fall.

Ticks can transmit up to 14 diseases to humans – don’t let the bloodsuckers ruin your summer or fall.

Many people are squeezing in the last bit of summer by enjoying the outdoors through walks, hiking on trails, biking, camping, outdoor sports, and picnics in parks and forests.  Unfortunately, these activities – sometimes even in our own backyards – increase our risk of being exposed to ticks and the diseases they carry.

Ticks are a nuisance.  No one wants anything on their body that drinks their blood or – worse than that – also give you a disease.  Most people are familiar with Lyme disease, but not the many other equally serious diseases that ticks carry. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now lists 14 diseases that ticks in the United States can transmit and cause human disease.  The CDC website also has regional distribution maps with pictures of the ticks that carry these diseases and where in the nation they are most like to be. Read more »

Grant Helps Farmers’ Sustainability Goals, Embrace New Technology

Young soybean plants thrive in the residue of a wheat crop. This form of no till farming provides good protection for the soil from erosion and helps retain moisture for the new crop. NRCS photo.

Young soybean plants thrive in the residue of a wheat crop. This form of no till farming provides good protection for the soil from erosion and helps retain moisture for the new crop. NRCS photo.

How can farmers reduce their fertilizer costs, maintain yields, reduce their environmental impacts, and take advantage of a new and emerging source of income? A project funded by a USDA Conservation Innovation Grant is showing how.

USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service awarded a CIG grant in 2011 to the Delta Institute to develop an innovative opportunity for farmers to receive greenhouse gas emissions reductions payments from the voluntary implementation of more efficient nitrogen fertilizer management techniques.

The Delta Institute engaged a variety of partners in the project, including American Farmland Trust, Conservation Technology Information Center, Environmental Defense Fund and agricultural retailers. Read more »