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Posts tagged: national forests

It’s Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month – Head for a National Forest

Kristin Merony and Tammy Randall-Parker, a Forest Service district ranger and a ski instructor at Telluride Mountain Resort, after Kristin’s first solo run down the mountain after a day of ski lessons. (U.S. Forest Service)

Kristin Merony and Tammy Randall-Parker, a Forest Service district ranger and a ski instructor at Telluride Mountain Resort, after Kristin’s first solo run down the mountain after a day of ski lessons. (U.S. Forest Service)

A new year means new resolutions and new adventures to embark upon. As many of you sit down to contemplate your goals of the year, I would like to suggest learning to ski or snowboard on national forests.

January is Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month, which means that on many resorts learning now can be the easiest and most affordable time to head to a forest near you. The U.S. Forest Service is host to 122 ski areas. The most visited forest, the White River National Forest, has 12 ski areas. Read more »

Downhill Thrill: The Life of a Snow Ranger during Alpine World Ski Championships

Max Forgensi, lead snow ranger for the Eagle-Holy Cross Ranger District

Max Forgensi is the lead snow ranger for the Eagle-Holy Cross Ranger District on the White River National Forest and for the International Ski Federation Alpine World Ski Championships in Vail, Colorado. (U.S. Forest Service/Roger Poirier)

There is an amazing partnership happening on public lands across this country, and it’s been ongoing for nearly a century.

You may not know that large private companies operate ski resorts on your national forests and for that reason the U.S. Forest Service has snow rangers across the country responsible for a myriad of jobs on different national forests. Snow rangers may issue backcountry avalanche advisories or assist the ski resorts with the development of summer activities. Snow rangers coordinate other recreation events like extreme races, while balancing proposals for new chairlifts, restaurants, and snowmaking lines.  The duties are endless and dynamic. Read more »

Archaeological Heritage of Colorado’s Ute Tribe Part of National Forests’ History in Rocky Mountain Region

Wickiups, conical-shape dwellings used by the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of southwestern Colorado, are still in use for ceremonial purposes. This photo shows a leaner Ute tipi from the 1870-1880s. The U.S. Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain Region partnered with the Dominguez Archaeological Research Group as part of the Region’s mission focus on historic and cultural preservation goals. (Photo courtesy of Curtis Martin, Dominguez Archaeological Research Group)

Wickiups, conical-shape dwellings used by the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of southwestern Colorado, are still in use for ceremonial purposes. This photo shows a leaner Ute tipi from the 1870-1880s. The U.S. Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain Region partnered with the Dominguez Archaeological Research Group as part of the Region’s mission focus on historic and cultural preservation goals. (Photo courtesy of Curtis Martin, Dominguez Archaeological Research Group)

There are small piles of fallen wooden timbers on national forests in the Rocky Mountain Region that tell a story of the area’s past. They are part of aboriginal wooden structures known as wickiups, a conical-shaped dwelling used by native people.

These relics are known to be part of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of southwestern Colorado and are still in use for ceremonial purposes. The relics are part of the tribe’s legacy of living on these lands and are a part of the cultural history on the Grand Mesa – Uncompahgre – Gunnison, San Juan, White River and Rio Grande national forests. Read more »

US Forest Service Waives Fees in Support of the Largest, Single-Day Volunteer Effort on Public Lands

Friends of Nevada Wilderness is a partner with the U.S. Forest Service for a National Public Lands Day Event at the Spring Mountains National Recreation Area near Las Vegas. (Courtesy of Friends of Nevada Wilderness/Jose Witt)

Friends of Nevada Wilderness is a partner with the U.S. Forest Service for a National Public Lands Day Event at the Spring Mountains National Recreation Area near Las Vegas. (Courtesy of Friends of Nevada Wilderness/Jose Witt)

As the waning, sweltering summer days transition to the cooler weather of autumn many people take the opportunity to give back by participating in the annual National Public Lands Day.

The Sept. 27 event, in its 21st year, is the nation’s largest, single-day volunteer effort in support of public lands. Last year, more than 175,000 volunteers at 2,237 sites worked hard, collected an estimated 23,000 pounds of invasive plants, planted about 100,000 trees, shrubs and other native plans and removed an estimated 500 tons of trash. Read more »

US Forest Service Chief Highlights Importance of Agency’s Role in Evaluating Groundwater Resources

As part of the Forest Service’s renewed emphasis on water quality and availability, the agency is developing a comprehensive policy to manage groundwater resources on national forests and grasslands.  Greer spring is found on the Mark Twain National Forest, Missouri. (U.S. Forest Service/Chris Carlson)

As part of the Forest Service’s renewed emphasis on water quality and availability, the agency is developing a comprehensive policy to manage groundwater resources on national forests and grasslands. Greer spring is found on the Mark Twain National Forest, Missouri. (U.S. Forest Service/Chris Carlson)

In recent years, we’ve seen growing concerns about the availability and quality of water across the country. Drought, climate change, land use changes, and needs for additional water highlight these concerns. Stewardship of water resources is one of this country’s most important natural resource issues. In fact, it’s one of the primary reasons national forests and grasslands were created.

As part of our renewed emphasis on water, we are developing a comprehensive policy to monitor, assess, evaluate and measure groundwater resources on national forests and grasslands. We began seeking public comments on May 6 asking your thoughts on a plan to strengthen our ability to protect water resources and support healthy and resilient ecosystems on Forest Service-managed lands. We extended the comment period to Oct. 3. Read more »

Land Acquisition Protects Headwaters in Oregon’s Malheur National Forest

The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness Area can be seen from one of the newly acquired parcels along the John Day River headwaters. (U.S. Forest Service/Ken Sandusky)

The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness Area can be seen from one of the newly acquired parcels along the John Day River headwaters. (U.S. Forest Service/Ken Sandusky)

On July 10, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and Malheur National Forest celebrated one of the largest land acquisitions in the history of the Pacific Northwest Region of the Forest Service.

This acquisition of 13,085 acres will consolidate protection of the headwaters of the John Day River, which drain from the Strawberry Mountains. The new land will fill in the gaps of what was a checkerboard arrangement around the headwaters, creating a protected area which now stretches more than 20,000 acres. Along with hunters and other recreationists, several species of wildlife and fish will benefit from this crucial linkage with existing public lands and established wildlife corridors. The river itself is home to endangered bull trout, as well as redband rainbow trout. It is also the destination for spawning mid-Columbia steelhead and chinook. Elk, deer, black bear, pronghorn, mountain goats, grouse and quail also make their home on the land surrounding the headwaters. Read more »