Become a fan on Facebook Follow us on Twitter USDA Blog Feed Watch USDA videos on YouTube Subscribe to receive e-mail updates View USDA Photos on Flickr Subscribe to RSS Feeds

Posts tagged: Northern Research Station

Faces of the Forest Celebrates Mark Twery

Mark Twery, a supervisory research forester on the Northern Research Station

Mark Twery, a supervisory research forester on the Northern Research Station

How does a former dancer and theater technician end up in a career in forestry? Meet Mark Twery, a supervisory research forester on the Northern Research Station in Burlington, Vt., who is not only all of the above, but loves his unique job that incorporates forestry with dance. Read more »

US Forest Service Researchers Make Good Use of old Fungus

Boletellus russellii grows under conifers and hardwoods, particularly oaks. It is found throughout most of eastern North America, but is relatively rare. The fungus grows around and actually covers tree roots, producing a fungal "mantle" that helps the tree absorb water and nutrients. (USDA Forest Service Photo)

Boletellus russellii grows under conifers and hardwoods, particularly oaks. It is found throughout most of eastern North America, but is relatively rare. The fungus grows around and actually covers tree roots, producing a fungal "mantle" that helps the tree absorb water and nutrients. (USDA Forest Service Photo)

U.S. Forest Service’s Northern Research Station is breaking out its 79-year-old collection of 20,000 fungus cultures – yes, the stuff that grows in dark, damp places – to help create a new 1,000-species fungal directory. Read more »

Carbon Study Conducted on US Forest Service Land Reveals Unexpected Results

A picture of one the U.S. Forest Service's 89 experimental forests. (Photo courtesy of the US Forest Service)

A picture of one the U.S. Forest Service's 89 experimental forests. (Photo courtesy of the US Forest Service)

A 12-year study on the U.S. Forest Service’s Harshaw Experimental Forest near Rhinelander, WI is challenging long-held assumptions about how future forests will respond to the rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Read more »

Forest Service Finds Local Government and Home Owners Pay the Price for Non-Native Insects

The emerald ash borer is an example of a non-native, wood-boring insect.

The emerald ash borer is an example of a non-native, wood-boring insect.

While invasive insect species are widely recognized as being among the greatest threats to biodiversity and ecosystem stability worldwide, there has been little research into their economic impact on the national level especially for non-native invasive species.

Many examples come to mind like the devastation caused by the native bark beetle in Colorado and surrounding states. However, what most don’t realize is that the threat from non-native insect species is equally if not more costly to U.S. tax payers. Read more »

US Forest Service Finds that Forests Play Huge Role in Reducing Carbon and Higher Global Temps

Forests absorb carbon like a giant sponge into what scientists call a carbon sink. This fact is well known throughout the scientific community. However, what scientists weren’t sure of until now is the amount of carbon forests can store.

For years scientists knew a large amount of carbon was somehow being stored but could not identify exactly how this was done. This is because less than half of the carbon dioxide released through fossil fuel use remains in the atmosphere. The remaining carbon enters the oceans and other carbon sinks including forests. Read more »

American Chestnut Trees Return to the Hoosier National Forest

Bedford, Ind., May 5, 2011 -- A group of Hoosier National Forest employees plant chestnut trees in a timber sale area of the Hoosier to return the American chestnut to its native range.Bedford, Ind., May 5, 2011 -- A group of Hoosier National Forest employees plant chestnut trees in a timber sale area of the Hoosier to return the American chestnut to its native range.

Bedford, Ind., May 5, 2011 -- A group of Hoosier National Forest employees plant chestnut trees in a timber sale area of the Hoosier to return the American chestnut to its native range (Photo Credit: US Forest Service).

Once a prominent phenomenon in southern Indiana, Bedford just experienced the first re-planting of American chestnut trees on the Hoosier National Forest in partnership with Purdue University and the U.S. Forest Service’s Northern Research Station. Read more »