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Posts tagged: Research and Promotion Program

Event in the Big Apple is No Small Peanuts

For nearly a week, the National Peanut Board invaded the streets of New York to connect the city to the more than 7,000 peanut farming families the board represents. To connect with New Yorkers, they set up a pop-up shop where visitors could sample foods, talk to peanut farmers, and much more. Photo Courtesy of the National Peanut Board.

For nearly a week, the National Peanut Board invaded the streets of New York to connect the city to the more than 7,000 peanut farming families the board represents. To connect with New Yorkers, they set up a pop-up shop where visitors could sample foods, talk to peanut farmers, and much more. Photo Courtesy of the National Peanut Board.

You may not see the natural connection between peanut farmers and New York City. However, I recently had the chance to see both worlds collide during a National Peanut Board meeting in the big apple. In addition to the normal items of business, the board also planned some unique peanut-inspired events for New Yorkers.

The National Peanut Board is one of the more than 20 industry Research and Promotion Programs that my agency – the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) oversees. These self-help programs that are requested for and completely funded by the industry are charged with developing cutting edge marketing campaigns and supporting nutrition research that benefits all of the industry’s members. The Peanut Board recently invaded the streets of New York to connect the city to the more than 7,000 peanut farming families the board represents. This proved to be very successful as everyone soon learned that our peanut farmers have a strong connection to New Yorkers and to people all over the world. Read more »

The Woman Who Cultivated a Billion-Dollar Industry

AMS, Women’s History Month, Elizabeth Coleman White, Blueberries, Research and Promotion Program, Specialty Crop Block Grant Program

Elizabeth Coleman White. A pioneer, she was the first to cultivate the wild blueberry. For her contributions to the agriculture industry, White was the first female to receive a citation from the New Jersey Department of Agriculture. Photo courtesy of New Jersey Women’s History, Rutgers University

A Whitesbog, NJ, native born in 1871, Elizabeth Coleman White spent her childhood summers helping out on her parents’ cranberry farm in the Pine Barrens.  While harvesting cranberries, she often wondered if the wild blueberries sprinkled on her parents’ farm could be cultivated like the cranberries. Conventional wisdom at the time held that wild blueberries varied too much in size and sweetness and could not be cultivated.  A true pioneer, she embarked on a new mission – cultivate the wild blueberry. Read more »