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Posts tagged: Thanksgiving

Makeover Your Holiday Meals with MyPlate! – Week 2

MyPlate Holiday Makeover: Green Mashed Potatoes

MyPlate Holiday Makeover: Green Mashed Potatoes

The MyPlate Team continues to share “Makeover Monday” recipes each week on the USDA blog and the MyPlate Facebook page through January 6th.

This recipe was originally created for another festive day.  But everyone loved “green-mash” potatoes so much that this family favorite became part of our Thanksgiving Feast.

Since my family has an Irish ancestry, we first started making this Green-Mash Potatoes Recipe for St. Patrick’s Day.  Green peas add a slightly sweet flavor, and the garlic and pepper gives it some zip.  The white pepper is optional, especially if serving to little kids.  A sprinkle of Kosher salt on top brings out the flavors, yet the sodium is much lower than traditional mashed potatoes.  And also, kids think the chartreuse-green color is fun! Read more »

Hay Más Que Una Manera de Cocinar el Pavo

La necesidad de velocidad. Carencia de espacio de horno. Tradiciones de familia. Cortes de corriente. Todos son motivos por cual muchos cocineros podrían buscar nuevos modos de asar el pavo entero fuera del horno. Considere los métodos siguientes sugeridos por la Línea de Información Sobre Carnes y Aves.

Pero primero, un mensaje sobre la inocuidad de los alimentos. Cualquier método que usted use para traer su pavo a la mesa, tenga un termómetro de alimento al alcance. Con el termómetro usted puede asegurar que el pavo ha alcanzado la temperatura interna mínima de 165 °F en la parte íntima del muslo, ala y la parte más gruesa del pecho. Si su pavo esta rellenado, el centro del relleno también debería alcanzar 165 °F. Después de cocinar,  permita un tiempo de reposo de 20 minutos antes de rebanar el pavo. Read more »

There’s More than One Way to Cook a Turkey

The need for speed. Lack of oven space. Family traditions. Power outages. All are reasons many cooks might look for ways to roast a whole turkey outside the usual oven. Consider the following methods suggested by the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline.

But first, a message about food safety. No matter which method you choose to get your turkey to the table, have a food thermometer handy so you can make sure the turkey has reached the safe minimum internal temperature of 165 °F in the innermost part of the thigh, wing and the thickest part of the breast.  If your turkey is stuffed, the center of the stuffing should also reach 165 °F. After cooking, let the turkey stand for 20 minutes before carving. Read more »

During the Holiday of Plenty, Remembering Those with Less

This morning, Huffington Post published an op-ed from USDA Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services Kevin Concannon highlighting the continued need for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, particularly around the holidays, and reiterating the need for Congress to act on a comprehensive, long-term Food, Farm and Jobs Bill.

As we gather around the dinner table this holiday season, we are called to reflect on our blessings–a healthy family, a job, a bountiful meal on the table. Yet there are millions of American families who are still rebuilding in the wake of the worst recession in decades–and they still need help.

As a country, we have always prided ourselves on providing–on a bipartisan basis–a responsive food assistance safety net through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). SNAP recipients have fallen on tough times, and the program provides temporary help to put healthy food on the table–but what does that mean in real terms?  Read more on Huffington Post.

I was Local When Local Wasn’t Cool

Under Secretary Avalos with fresh apples from the USDA Farmers Market.  Share your favorite local ingredients by mentioning @AMS_USDA and using the #LocalisCool hashtag.

Under Secretary Avalos with fresh apples from the USDA Farmers Market. Share your favorite local ingredients by mentioning @AMS_USDA and using the #LocalisCool hashtag.

No one would ever accuse me of being a trend-setter—especially my kids.  But I’m proud to say that I’ve been part of the local food movement my whole life. I grew up on a family farm in New Mexico.  For us, local food wasn’t really a trend or a movement.  It was how we made our living.  By growing, raising and selling our food throughout the year, we connected to other farmers, ranchers and our neighbors.

More American families are making a conscious decision to eat healthier and buy local foods.  Many farmers and producers are combining their hard work with innovative practices like hoop houses and new marketing opportunities like food hubs.  These are two examples of modern approaches that are helping extend growing and selling seasons and bringing farmers and suppliers together to meet the increasing demand for local foods. Read more »

To Wash or Not to Wash… Your Turkey?

Washing anything makes it cleaner and safer, right? Not necessarily.

Wash your hands, but not the turkey!  Many consumers think that washing their turkey will remove bacteria and make it safer.  However, it’s virtually impossible to wash bacteria off the bird. Instead, juices that splash during washing can transfer bacteria onto the surfaces of your kitchen, other foods and utensils. This is called cross-contamination, which can make you and your guests very sick.  Washing your hands before and after handling your turkey and its packaging is crucial to avoid spreading harmful bacteria. Read more »