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Posts tagged: Tongass National Forest

Alaska Beavers Entertain Web Cam Viewers Around the World

A busy beaver gathering a tree sprig

A busy beaver gathers a tree sprig to help build his lodge on Steep Creek on Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. Photo courtesy of Don Martin, Tongass National Forest

Two beavers sleep peacefully in their den on Steep Creek in Juneau, Alaska, never realizing they are being watched via a hidden infrared camera. Hundreds of viewers tune-in to a live video feed on the U.S. Forest Service YouTube Channel throughout the day to see the beavers come and go, breathing rhythmically as they nap and then stretch, chew and scratch an occasional itch.

Although the beaver cam is now an established fixture at the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center, it started out of simple curiosity according to Pete Schneider, a natural resource specialist for the Tongass National Forest. He and fisheries biologist Don Martin first experimented with a beaver cam in 2004 after they saw a cache of food in front of a beaver lodge on Steep Creek. It was a sure indication that beavers, who have a tendency to move around, were actually using the lodge at the time. They decided to run electricity through a conduit to that location in order to power an infrared camera. Read more »

Alaskan High School Students Learn Valuable Skills at “Fish Boot Camp”

The Twelvemile Creek restoration monitoring crew and Fish Tech Boot Camp students and instructors posing for a photo in front of a screw trap

The Twelvemile Creek restoration monitoring crew and Fish Tech Boot Camp students and instructors pose for a photo in front of a screw trap, which captures coho and steelhead smolt that our migrating out to the ocean. The fish are released after being measured and marked with a coded wire tag. Students from Port Protection, Thorne Bay, and Klawock, Alaska, joined the crew composed of staff from the U.S. Forest Service, Sitka Conservation Society and the University of Alaska Southeast Fish Tech Program. Photo credit: Scott Harris, Sitka Conservation Society

This post was co-authored with Andrew Thoms, Executive Director of the Sitka Conservation Society.

“The thing that our forests grow best is salmon!” is the local phrase that a visitor is most likely to hear when visiting some of the 32 communities that live near the Tongass National Forest of Southeast Alaska. 

Tongass National Forest staff, local school districts, a local conservation organization, and the University of Alaska have undertaken a joint project to figure out how a forest can be managed to create jobs and other economic opportunities and guarantee the long-term sustainable yield of the Tongass’ fisheries resources. Read more »

Alaska’s Newest Live Stream Salmon Cam Debuts

Visitors at the Crooked Creek Information Center in Valdez, Alaska looking at a bear and salmon

Visitors at the Crooked Creek Information Center in Valdez, Alaska can see the spawning salmon from the viewing platform and the bears that feed on them. (USFS Photo by Jeannie Kirkland)

The City of Valdez, Alaska, offers a unique destination for visitors because of the proximity to the Crooked Creek Information Center, the most visited information center on the Chugach National Forest. Situated alongside the creek, a fish viewing platform beckons guests to take in the salmon returning to spawn each summer.

So what if you can’t make it to Alaska this summer? You can still experience the wonder through the Crooked Creek underwater fish cam.

An underwater camera has offered images of the swimming fish at Crooked Creek for several years; however, it was only linked to a monitor on the fish viewing platform. Visitors could get the bird’s-eye view of the creek from the platform, and then watch the fish underwater on the monitor. This summer, Andrew Morin, a fisheries biologist in Cordova, joined other Chugach employees to make the Crooked Creek fish cam available to the world via the Forest Service YouTube live streaming video. Read more »

Catch a Wild Alaskan Sockeye: Watch Live Stream as the Annual Homecoming Begins

Salmon Cam Poster

They Are Coming! Salmon Poster

An easy nine miles from the city of Juneau, a portion of a small non-glacial tributary creek nestled among alder, cottonwood and beds of dense, lush moss and understory vegetation is again sharing its ancient story of birth, death and renewal: sockeye and coho salmon are swimming home to spawn.

Yet visitors who want to take in this yearly natural story can view the wonder from the comfort of their own homes via a live online streaming from an underwater camera. Read more »

Cultivating Native Leaders in Conservation

Sierra Ezrre, Tlingit high school student from Juneau, Alaska, and Carrie Sykes, Haida Cultural Educator from Kasaan, Alaska

Sierra Ezrre, Tlingit high school student from Juneau, Alaska, and Carrie Sykes, Haida Cultural Educator from Kasaan, Alaska, participate in the Inter-Tribal Youth Climate Change Leadership Congress, July, 2015.

Recently, ninety Alaska Native, American Indian, and Native Hawaiian high school students came together at the National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, West Virginia for a week of intensive education and peer-to-peer training about the impact of climate change on tribal communities. Organized by the Inter-Tribal Youth Climate Leaders Congress and supported by a partnership between the U.S. Forest Service, the Department of Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the National Park Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the Environmental Protection Agency, the gathering included Jadelynn Akamu, Ylliana Hanato, Alisha Keli’i, and Aaron Knell from Honolulu’s Hawai’i Youth Conservation Corps and Forest Service partner KUPU, as well as a team from Juneau, Alaska, including Alaska Native student Sierra Ezrre and her mentor and culture keeper Carrie Sykes. Read more »

Tlingit Master Carver Restores a 74-year-old Totem in Alaska

Tlingit Master Carver Wayne Price of Haines stands near the totem he is restoring. The totem has overlooked the Auke Recreation Area for more than 70 years. (U.S. Forest Service photo by Laurie Craig)

Tlingit Master Carver Wayne Price of Haines stands near the totem he is restoring. The totem has overlooked the Auke Recreation Area for more than 70 years. (U.S. Forest Service photo by Laurie Craig)

In a small U.S. Forest Service workshop in Juneau, Alaska, a skilled Alaska Native artist is meticulously bringing a traditional artifact back to life. Tlingit Master Carver Wayne Price of Haines has begun the process of restoring the totem, which has overlooked the Auke Recreation Area near Juneau for more than 70 years.

In 1941, Frank St. Clair, a Tlingit from Hoonah, and two members of the Civilian Conservation Corps, originally carved the Yax té or Big Dipper totem, which symbolizes a “place where a strong tribe flourished.” The Aak’w Kwáan, according to historical documents, were Tlingit people and among the first to settle in the Juneau area. Read more »