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Posts tagged: Wayne National Forest

Celebrating a New Employee and the Congressional Act that Made it Possible

Matthew Martin sharpening his chainsaw

Matthew Martin sharpening his chainsaw prior to using it to clear debris off designated trails and to remove hazard trees from recreation areas. Photo credit: US Forest Service

Last June was one for the record books as Matthew Martin achieved his long-term goal of becoming a permanent employee with the U.S. Forest Service, an achievement made possible via a new hiring authority being used by the federal land management agency.

A second generation Forest Service employee, one could say that forestry was in Matthew’s DNA, which is certainly reflected in the hard work he did leading up to his permanent hire as a Forestry Technician on the Wayne National Forest. Read more »

Recycling Christmas Trees on National Forests a Seasonal Tradition

Recycled trees placed in a fish crib. (U.S. Forest Service)

Recycled trees placed in a fish crib. (U.S. Forest Service)

For many, purchasing or cutting a Christmas tree is a favorite seasonal tradition. But what do you do with your trees after the festivities end?

Tree recycling after the holidays has become part of community traditions on several Eastern Region national forests. Recycled trees can be used to establish fish habitats, create mulch for future plantings and build soil erosion barriers. Using the trees for these purposes also keeps them from filling up local landfills.

Land managers of several national forests in the area have found that the old Christmas trees can be used to make a cozy home for schools of fish. Fish habitats create ideal spawning grounds to ensure successful reproduction, a place of refuge and shade for the young, and shelter from predators. Also, fish habitats provide a food source – a breeding ground for algae and plankton to attract bait fish and lure larger fish to favorite fishing spots. Read more »

Abandoned Mine Lands Restored to Improve Watershed Health in Ohio

Water quality is monitored by volunteers with the Monday Creek Restoration Project. MCRP photo.

Water quality is monitored by volunteers with the Monday Creek Restoration Project. MCRP photo.

For nearly a century, the aquatic life that once thrived in the Monday Creek Watershed has been virtually dead. The goal of this Recovery Act project, known as “Devastation to Destination,” is to construct a healthy functioning riparian corridor, restore water quality, and create an integrated land management strategy resulting in species diversity among existing aquatic and wildlife habitats. It is located in Perry County between the towns of New Straitsville and Shawnee, Ohio. Read more »