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New Dietary Guidelines Urge Consumers to Enjoy Food, but watch Calories In, Calories Out

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius (seated right) announced the release of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans in the George Washington University Jack Morton Auditorium, Monday, January 31 in Washington, DC. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans is the federal governments evidence-based nutritional guidance to promote health, reduce the risk of chronic diseases and reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity through improved nutrition and physical activity.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius (seated right) announced the release of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans in the George Washington University Jack Morton Auditorium, Monday, January 31 in Washington, DC. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans is the federal governments evidence-based nutritional guidance to promote health, reduce the risk of chronic diseases and reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity through improved nutrition and physical activity.

Today I had the honor to join the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Kathleen Sebelius to release the 2010 Dietary Guidelines – a science-based roadmap to give busy individuals, moms and dads the information to make thoughtful choices for themselves and their families. It was inspiring to see so many young people in the audience, followed by important health and nutrition questions from George Washington University students.

The Guidelines reinforce what folks already know – that healthy lives are built on a foundation of calories in, calories out.  To maintain a healthy weight and avoid the complications and potential health risks of being overweight, calories in should equal calories out.  If your goal is to lose weight, calories out must exceeded calories in.

Regardless of your goals or age, you should eat healthier foods in the right portions. Today we talked about filling half of your plate with fruits and veggies. Families should work to maintain a balanced diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein including fish, and low fat dairy while taking care to limit sodium, sugar and fat. USDA even has a Menu Planner tool that I have found useful to see what foods I should be eating based on my age and level of physical activity.

Balance that healthy eating with regular physical activity of at least 30 minutes a day, five times a week, for adults and 60 minutes a day for children and we have a recipe for healthy lifestyles. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines offer a science-based roadmap that can be used by busy individuals, moms and dads, as well as health and education professionals.

Today we face a national health crisis with the majority of adults and one in three children are overweight or obese. And this is a crisis that America can no longer ignore. And so today we acknowledge that we all have room to improve our eating habits and get more physical activity. It is not only good for every individual and family, but also for our country.

If you missed this morning’s livestream, you can watch or listen online. Be sure to check out the 2010 Dietary Guidelines here, and for more information on dietary guidelines, see www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines and www.healthfinder.gov/prevention

From left: Assistant Secretary for Health, Department of Health and Human Services Dr. Howard Koh, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, Director, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion Robert Post and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius answer audience and reporters’ questions after the announcement of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans in the George Washington University Jack Morton Auditorium, Monday, January 31 in Washington, DC. The new Dietary Guidelines for Americans focus on balancing calories with physical activity and encourage Americans to consume more healthy foods like vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, seafood and to consume less sodium, saturated and trans fats, added sugars and refined grains.

From left: Assistant Secretary for Health, Department of Health and Human Services Dr. Howard Koh, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, Director, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion Robert Post and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius answer audience and reporters’ questions after the announcement of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans in the George Washington University Jack Morton Auditorium, Monday, January 31 in Washington, DC. The new Dietary Guidelines for Americans focus on balancing calories with physical activity and encourage Americans to consume more healthy foods like vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, seafood and to consume less sodium, saturated and trans fats, added sugars and refined grains.

5 Responses to “New Dietary Guidelines Urge Consumers to Enjoy Food, but watch Calories In, Calories Out”

  1. acampbell says:
  2. Nancy Goren says:

    While I support your efforts to provide Americans with healthy dietary information, I don’t see many differences in these new recommendations from previous ones, which didn’t seem to help Americans slim down and get healthy. The new diet plan relies heavily on the premiss that people are eating too many calories, and since fat contains three times as many calories per gram as carbohydrate, “logic” says to reduce fat. Not exactly true. Obesity is a metabolic disorder of insulin resistance. Insulin is released as a response to eating carbohydrates – to turn them into blood glucose in the liver. Diabetes is a consequence of eating too many carbohydrates, like sodas and refined carbohydrates, even whole grains, not from too many fats.

    It would be much more helpful if you advised Americans to count carbohydrates rather than fats, and limit carbohydrate consumption to 15 to 20 grams per meal to lose weight.

  3. Robert White says:

    Ya wanta know something ! I’m 66 years old and have watched our great country backslid in too many ways, one of which is the eating habits of our people. we reached the point where way too many adult are excessively overweight for various reasons one of which is that we pay them lots of money to sit at home,nonetheless I feel that there is little we can do to change minds and habits of the majority of the group, I’m not a big fan of the first lady but she got it right–save the kids –
    as far as the adults concerned, well if they choose to do something actively then I would give them a high five along with any and all the advise and knowledge I could find because they will need support with their new found goals thanks

    goo.gl/fuO69

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