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Forest Service Launches New Wildland Fire Website

The Mountain Fire in the San Bernardino National Forest in California began on July 15, 2013 and consumed 27, 531 acres until it was 100 percent contained on July 30. The U.S. Forest Service Burned Area Emergency Response Team is now conducting a rapid assessment of the fire area to assess the damage. (U.S. Forest Service photo)

The Mountain Fire in the San Bernardino National Forest in California began on July 15, 2013 and consumed 27, 531 acres until it was 100 percent contained on July 30. The U.S. Forest Service Burned Area Emergency Response Team is now conducting a rapid assessment of the fire area to assess the damage. (U.S. Forest Service photo)

This blog is part of a series from the U.S. Forest Service on its wildland firefighting program to increase awareness about when and how the agency suppresses fires, to provide insights into the lives of those fighting fires, and to explain some of the cutting-edge research underway on fire behavior. Check back to the USDA Blog during the 2013 wildfire season for new information. Additional resources are available at www.fs.fed.us/wildlandfire/.

The U.S. Forest Service has managed wildland fire for more than 100 years. As the world’s premiere wildland fire organization, the agency provides critically needed resources and expertise to protect at-risk communities. From ‘boots on the ground,’ to airtanker drops overhead, to groundbreaking research in the lab, Forest Service personnel around the country are ready to answer the call of duty.

The Forest Service launched a new wildland fire website with insightful information to help you learn about all these Forest Service activities from before, during and after a wildland fire. You’ll read about how the Forest Service feeds its firefighters, how they live while in fire camp and about the state-of-the-art technology they use while protecting natural resources and communities.

Heli-Rappellers can be called upon when fire fighters need to be inserted into the forest to fight fire where there is no easy access by road or a place for a helicopter to land close to the fire. The helicopter will hover anywhere between 50 and 200 feet while the crew members rappel in. Once the crew is on the ground all of their saw packs, tools and supplies are lowered down to them so they can quickly get to work fighting fire. (US Forest Service photo/Tara Ross)

Heli-Rappellers can be called upon when fire fighters need to be inserted into the forest to fight fire where there is no easy access by road or a place for a helicopter to land close to the fire. The helicopter will hover anywhere between 50 and 200 feet while the crew members rappel in. Once the crew is on the ground all of their saw packs, tools and supplies are lowered down to them so they can quickly get to work fighting fire. (US Forest Service photo/Tara Ross)

You can even find out what you can do to protect your home from wildland fires. And, learning about wildland fires is important for all generations so information for kids and students is also available on the website.

Two members of the Idaho City Hotshots work on the Springs Fire on the Boise National Forest, August, 2012. Hotshot crews are the best of the best of wildland fire fighters.  They have been extensively trained to fight fires in remote areas with little or no logistical support in the most demanding conditions. (US Forest Service photo/Kari Greer)

Two members of the Idaho City Hotshots work on the Springs Fire on the Boise National Forest, August, 2012. Hotshot crews are the best of the best of wildland fire fighters. They have been extensively trained to fight fires in remote areas with little or no logistical support in the most demanding conditions. (US Forest Service photo/Kari Greer)

With the 2013 wildfire season underway check back to the wildland fire website often for updates. Also, stay tuned to the USDA Blog for more postings as part of the Forest Service wildland fire blog series – with many stories shared straight from the field.

Forest Service firefighters wrap a cabin in Aluminized Structure Wrap to protect the building from radiant heat and burning embers from the Silver Fire on the Gila National Forest in 2012. Wrapping a structure is the best protection strategy when it's too dangerous to stay. (US Forest Service photo)

Forest Service firefighters wrap a cabin in Aluminized Structure Wrap to protect the building from radiant heat and burning embers from the Silver Fire on the Gila National Forest in 2012. Wrapping a structure is the best protection strategy when it's too dangerous to stay. (US Forest Service photo)

4 Responses to “Forest Service Launches New Wildland Fire Website”

  1. Chris Daley says:

    Totally amazing. It sure seems like fire has increased in the past decade or so. And we learn/ grow as result doing a better job meeting this challenge. Yarnell AZ reminds us of the dangers.

  2. Suzi says:

    Well done and informative, thank you.

  3. Arlen says:

    An ounce of Prevention… One Less Spark = One Less Wildfire

    http://www.preventwildfireca.org/OneLessSpark/

    Not all fire is bad, but unwanted wildfire is dangerous.

  4. Charles Edward Weber says:

    I take note of your concern over forest fire loss. There is nothing more destructive than a forest fire, not only to plants but also to most animals. I suggest that we should take much more action to prevent such loss than we do. I think I know of an inexpensive way of creating a forest fire break that would limit the damage. That is to create cleared strips with a plywood wall, especially if combined with a wooden pipe sprinkler system. If the wall were treated with sodium silicate solution it would become fire proof itself. I do not have data as to the feasibility of preventing rain from washing out the sodium silicate, but I am confident that certain paints would work. You may see this discussed in detail in http://www.angelfire.com/nc/isoptera/index.html .
    As for preemptive fires, deliberate setting of fires in our forests borders on insanity. Letting accidental fires rage out of control is almost as nutty. A much more sensible solution would be to remove and grind up debris and brush either for farm soil organic amendments or to generate electricity, the last giving a by product of potassium hydroxide for acid soil. It would be much safer than coal mining and probably cheaper.

    Even if I have not persuaded you that forest fires are not a good idea, at least I am sure you would agree that protecting people’s wooden homes located in forests would be in order. It is not too smart to allow our homes outside of forests to burn down either. When they are rebuilt, huge amounts of energy and wood are used. Funerals for the ones who fail to make it out in time use a fair amount of energy also. My vote is none of such funerals and many less for coal miners by use of sodium silicate.

    Sincerely, Charles Weber

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