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It’s National Pollinator Week: Bee with Us Friday for a Twitter Chat with Beekeepers & Join Us for the Fifth Pollinator Week Festival at USDA

Pollinator Week Festival. June 20, 2014. 10 am – 2pm outside USDA headquarters.

Pollinator Week Festival. June 20, 2014. 10 am – 2pm outside USDA headquarters.

How do pollinators affect your life? Well, if you’ve ever eaten a blueberry, chocolate bar or tomato, you can thank a pollinator. Pollinators are birds, bats, butterflies, moths, flies, beetles, wasps, small mammals, and most importantly, bees. They are responsible for pollinating one out of every three bites of food we eat. But these invaluable creatures are facing declines. That’s why USDA agencies, other federal departments and partners share knowledge and collaborate on efforts to help increase awareness and tackle challenges facing pollinators.

Last month, USDA launched a webcam that is literally buzzing with activity at the People’s Garden Apiary, located here on the roof of USDA headquarters in Washington, DC. Observing these social insects at #USDABeeWatch is fascinating and addicting. If you’ve been watching then you probably have a lot of questions about honey bee behavior and beekeeping. Meet our Beekeepers Nathan Rice and Andy Ulsamer virtually on Friday at Noon and ask them questions about what you’re seeing. Tweet to us @USDA and use #USDABeeWatch. Feel free to send your questions ahead of time, and we will respond to as many as possible during the chat.

And that’s not all. You and your family can learn how to support and protect pollinators of all kinds at the fifth annual Pollinator Week Festival at USDA on Friday, June 20 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at USDA’s Farmers Market in Washington, DC along 12th Street between Jefferson Drive and Independence Avenue, SW. Buzz on over to learn from experts, watch live bees, participate in pollinator-friendly activities, and see what efforts, big and small, you can take in your own backyard to help pollinators.

USDA’s People’s Garden Initiative is pleased to host the Pollinator Week Festival with Pollinator Partnership. National Pollinator Week, June 16-22, events are happening all over the country. Find an event in your area!

Bees are one of nature’s many pollinators for flowers and crops and are crucial in production for fruits and vegetables. USDA Photo by Forest Service.

Bees are one of nature’s many pollinators for flowers and crops and are crucial in production for fruits and vegetables. USDA Photo by Forest Service.

6 Responses to “It’s National Pollinator Week: Bee with Us Friday for a Twitter Chat with Beekeepers & Join Us for the Fifth Pollinator Week Festival at USDA”

  1. Kimberly Randolph says:

    Very informational and I just volunteered to be the Wellness Coordinator for our floor and our office is participating in the http://www.GoodNaturedFamilyFarms.com
    CSA Community Supported Agriculture that allows us to purchase food weekly and have it payroll deducted and have it delivered on. Exciting

  2. Veronica Redifer says:

    I am interested in starting a bee hive and community garden. I have no experience with bee’s, but feel it is a vital component to gardening and securing a healthy bee habitat.

    What can you suggests for a beginner who has the heart and the commitment to saving our EARTH for future generations.

    Thank you for any and all input.
    Sincerely yours,

    Veronica J. Redifer,
    Environmental Technician
    Klawock Cooperative Tribe
    Environmental Department

  3. Noi Whitener says:

    Can anyone purchase bee’s too pollenate in my community?

    I’m seriously considering having bee’s to make our own honey.

  4. Karl Hansen says:

    Thank you for starting the conversation on Pollinators. Awareness and education are the key.

    If you are interested in starting a Honey Bee Hive reach out to your local beekeeping club. Yes, most clubs are done by county and or state level.

    It is how my wife and I started beekeeping six years ago. Going to your local bee club mmetings is the start to connecting to a beekeeper who can help you get started. note – many beekeeping classes are in the winter months so you can learn, order equipment and a pacakge of bees to arrive in April to start your colony / hive. But you can visit hives and talk to people to collect information on next steps.

    Good luck and do not give up reaching out – beekkeepers are busy in the spring and summer months. It might take some time to get a reply back form your local beekeeprs club.

    Karl

  5. OC Carlisle says:

    Wish I had been there. Love our pollinators. They “give” us food!

  6. ghazi taan says:

    I wish to produce my pure honey
    how can I learn procedure,is there a fund for this
    I am living in Lebanon middle east
    thank u

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