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Posts tagged: AMS

USDA Marketing Order Provides Ingredients for Olive Industry’s Success

Man working on family farm

A commitment to consistency, marketing, and research. These factors help the nearly 1,000 family farms from California supply 95 percent of the ripe olives grown in the U.S. Photo courtesy of the California Olive Committee.

Each industry has its own recipe for success. For the ripe olive industry, the recipe for success includes many ingredients. This includes a commitment to consistency, marketing, and research. These factors help the nearly 1,000 family farms from California supply 95 percent of the ripe olives grown in the U.S.

The USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) provides the ripe olive industry many of the ingredients for its success. One of the ways we do this is by overseeing the federal marketing order for olives grown in California, which is administered locally by the California Olive Committee. Federal marketing orders and agreements are requested by various groups in the U.S. produce industry to help growers and handlers within a geographic region to overcome marketing barriers and increase awareness of the commodity. Industry groups get together to decide the tools needed to support the commercial and financial success of the businesses in the industry. Read more »

Organic Growth – 27,000+ Certified Organic Operations around the World

USDA Certified Organic Operations graphic

At the end of 2014, there were a record 19,474 certified organic producers in the United States and 27,814 certified organic operations around the world.

This is the twenty-fourth installment of the Organic 101 series that explores different aspects of the USDA organic regulations.

Across the country, more and more people are looking for organic options at their local markets.  Thanks to the remarkable growth in the number of domestic and international certified organic operations, Americans now have more choices than ever.
 
In fact, according to data released today by my agency, the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), there were 19,474 certified organic producers in the United States and 27,814 certified organic operations around the world at the end of 2014.  In just one year, the number of U.S. certified organic operations increased by more than 5 percent.  And since the count began in 2002, the number of domestic organic operations has increased by over 250 percent.  You can access the full list of certified operations at http://apps.ams.usda.gov/nop/ or download the list in Excel format going back to 2010. Read more »

USDA Marketing Orders and Agreements Foster Industry Innovation

Vidalia Onions are only grown in Georgia. In the past 5 years, the Vidalia Onion Committee increased its focus on research. After seeing consumers demand the traditional Vidalia onion, the committee decided to ensure that the onion that they marketed was of the best eating quality. (Photo courtesy of the Vidalia Onion Committee)

Vidalia Onions are only grown in Georgia. In the past 5 years, the Vidalia Onion Committee increased its focus on research. After seeing consumers demand the traditional Vidalia onion, the committee decided to ensure that the onion that they marketed was of the best eating quality. (Photo courtesy of the Vidalia Onion Committee)

Success is often achieved when you have access to a number of tools and know how and when to use them. The USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) is equipping produce businesses with the proper tools for success through our Marketing Order and Agreement Division (MOAD). As discussed before, this division administers fruit and vegetable marketing orders and agreements designed to support the industry’s financial and commercial success with the help of tools such as funding production and market research.

As self-help programs requested for and completely funded by the industry, marketing orders and agreements can address issues ranging from combating invasive species to identifying key product attributes based on consumer preferences. Our MOAD employees oversee industry boards and committees as they partner with local universities and organizations to overcome these types of challenges. Read more »

#GimmeFive Ways to Boost Your Garden and Keep Pollinators Buzzing

A monarch butterfly collects nectar from a flower. USDA photo by Charles Bryson.

A monarch butterfly collects nectar from a flower. USDA photo by Charles Bryson.

The USDA’s People’s Garden team is joining the fun at the White House Easter Egg Roll today to introduce the crowds to some very important garden workers – pollinators. Bees, butterflies, bats, birds, and beetles are all crucial to sustaining plant growth, and in fact nearly two-thirds of the foods we often consume are pollinated by bees alone. Doing your part to keep these creatures healthy in turn ensures a nutritious food supply for you and me.

Honey bees are responsible for pollinating more than 100 crops and one out of every three bites of food Americans eat. These foods give our diet diversity, flavor, and nutrition.  Over the past few decades, there has been a significant loss of pollinator habitat and pollinators, including honey bees, native bees, birds, bats, and butterflies, from the environment. Declining pollinator populations across the country pose a threat to our environment, economy and human health, but supporting pollinators is not hard to do. Read more »

Event in the Big Apple is No Small Peanuts

For nearly a week, the National Peanut Board invaded the streets of New York to connect the city to the more than 7,000 peanut farming families the board represents. To connect with New Yorkers, they set up a pop-up shop where visitors could sample foods, talk to peanut farmers, and much more. Photo Courtesy of the National Peanut Board.

For nearly a week, the National Peanut Board invaded the streets of New York to connect the city to the more than 7,000 peanut farming families the board represents. To connect with New Yorkers, they set up a pop-up shop where visitors could sample foods, talk to peanut farmers, and much more. Photo Courtesy of the National Peanut Board.

You may not see the natural connection between peanut farmers and New York City. However, I recently had the chance to see both worlds collide during a National Peanut Board meeting in the big apple. In addition to the normal items of business, the board also planned some unique peanut-inspired events for New Yorkers.

The National Peanut Board is one of the more than 20 industry Research and Promotion Programs that my agency – the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) oversees. These self-help programs that are requested for and completely funded by the industry are charged with developing cutting edge marketing campaigns and supporting nutrition research that benefits all of the industry’s members. The Peanut Board recently invaded the streets of New York to connect the city to the more than 7,000 peanut farming families the board represents. This proved to be very successful as everyone soon learned that our peanut farmers have a strong connection to New Yorkers and to people all over the world. Read more »

In Conversation with #WomeninAg: Naomi Starkman

Former farmer Naomi Starkman is now the editor of Civil Eats, an award winning blog covering food and agriculture. Photo credit: Naomi Fiss.

Former farmer Naomi Starkman is now the editor of Civil Eats, an award winning blog covering food and agriculture. Photo credit: Naomi Fiss.

In agriculture we know that the work of women in our field reaches far beyond one month out of the year and should be celebrated every day. We got such a great response to our Women’s History Month weekly profiles in March that we will now be expanding to a monthly series. We will continue to feature women leaders across agriculture who are opening doors for their peers and contributing to the larger conversation about #womeninag.

To help us get started, this month, we profile Naomi Starkman, the founder and editor-in-chief of Civil Eats. Naomi is also a founding board member and advisor to the Food & Environment Reporting Network. A recovering lawyer, Naomi has worked as a media consultant at The New Yorker and Newsweek magazines and on several farms. Read more »